Etymology
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Raza (n.)

in La Raza, literally "the race," 1964, from American Spanish (see race (n.2)), "designating the strong sense of racial and cultural identity held by Mexican-Americans" [OED].

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witness (v.)

c. 1300, "bear testimony," from witness (n.). Meaning "affix one's signature to (a document) to establish its identity" is from early 14c. Meaning "see or know by personal presence, observe" is from 1580s. Related: Witnessed; witnessing.

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bonk (v.)

"to hit," 1931, probably of imitative origin; it is attested by 1975 in the sense of "have sexual intercourse with." Related: Bonked; bonking. As a noun from 1938; in the sexual sense by 1984.

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loving (n.)

"love, friendship," also "sexual love," late 14c., verbal noun from love (v.).

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sexually (adj.)

1650s, "by means of sex; after the manner of the sexes;" see sexual + -ly (2).

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yoni (n.)

1799, from Sanskrit, "female sexual principle as an object of veneration," literally "vulva, womb."

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sexology (n.)

"scientific study of sex and sexual relations," 1902, from sex (n.) + -ology. Related: Sexologist.

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transsexual 

1957 (adj. and n.), from trans- + sexual, and compare transsexualism.

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transsexualism (n.)

"intense desire to change one's sexual status, including the anatomical structure," 1953, coined by U.S. physician Harry Benjamin (1885-1986) from trans- + sexual. Transsexuality is recorded from 1941, but was used at first to mean "homosexuality" or "bisexuality." In the current sense from 1955.

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