Etymology
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Midrash (n.)

"exposition or interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures," 1610s, from Hebrew (Semitic) midhrash, from darash "tread, frequent, seek, search, apply oneself to."

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Abbassid 
dynasty of caliphs of Baghdad (C.E. 750-1258) claiming descent from Abbas (566-652), uncle of the Prophet. His name is from the same Semitic source as abbot. With patronymic suffix.
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Bethany 
Biblical village, its name in Hebrew or Aramaic (Semitic) is literally "house of poverty," from bet "house of" (construct state of bayit "house") + 'anya "poverty."
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xiphoid (adj.)
"sword-shaped," 1746, from Greek xiphos "a sword," of unknown origin (Klein suggests a Semitic source and compares Hebrew sayif, Arabic sayf) + -oid.
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Samaria 
from Greek Samareia, from Aramaic (Semitic) Shamerayin, ultimately from Hebrew Shomeron, from Shemer, name of the owner who sold the site to King Omri (see I Kings xvi.24).
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aleph (n.)
name for the Hebrew and Phoenician first letter, ancestor of A, c. 1300, from Semitic languages, pausal form of eleph "ox" (the character might have developed from a hieroglyph of an ox's head); also see alphabet.
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Nile 

river in Africa, one of the world's oldest surviving place names, from a Semitic root nahal "river." Unnamed in Old Testament, it is always merely "the river" (Hebrew yeor).

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alcove (n.)
"vaulted recess," 1670s, from French alcôve (17c.), from Spanish alcoba, from Arabic al-qobbah "the vaulted chamber," from Semitic base q-b-b "to be bent, crooked, vaulted." The al- is the Arabic definite article, "the."
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Tabitha 
fem. proper name, from Late Latin, from Greek Tabitha, from Aramaic (Semitic) tabhyetha, emphatic of tabhya "gazelle," which is related to Hebrew tzebhi (fem. tzebhiyyah), Arabic zaby.
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Saudi (adj.)
1933, from Sa'ud, family name of the rulers of Nejd from 18c. and of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia since 1932. The name is from Arabic sa'd "good fortune, happiness." With common Semitic national designation suffix -i.
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