Etymology
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alehouse (n.)

also ale-house, Old English ealahus; see ale + house (n.). In the same sense Old English had also ealusele. An alehouse "is distinguished from a tavern, where they sell wine" [Johnson].

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auctioneer (n.)
1708, "one whose business is to offer goods or property for sale by auction," from auction (n.) + -eer. From 1733 as a verb, "to sell by auction." Related: Auctioneering.
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merchandize (v.)

also merchandise, late 14c., "to buy and sell, to engage in commerce," from merchandise (v.). The original sense was obsolete by late 19c. Meaning "to promote the sale of goods" is from 1926. Related: Merchandising; merchandizing.

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syndicate (v.)
1889, "form into a syndicate," from syndicate (n.). Meaning "sell for simultaneous publication" is from 1889. Earlier it meant "to judge, censure" (1610s), from Medieval Latin syndicatus, past participle of syndicare. Related: Syndicated; syndicating.
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job (v.)
1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker" (intransitive), from job (n.). Meaning "deal in public stocks on one's own account" is from 1721. Meaning "to cheat, betray" is from 1903; earlier "pervert public service to private advantage" (1732). Related: Jobbed; jobbing.
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peddle (v.)

"to retail, to sell in small quantities" (trans.), 1837, a colloquial back-formation from peddler. Earlier in intransitive sense of "travel about retailing small wares" (1530s). Related: Peddled; peddling. Peddling as "trifling, petty, insignificant" is by 1590s.

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addict (v.)

1530s (implied in addicted) "to devote or give up (oneself) to a habit or occupation," from Latin addictus, past participle of addicere "to deliver, award, yield; make over, sell," properly "give one's assent to," figuratively "to devote, consecrate; sacrifice, sell out, betray, abandon," from ad "to" (see ad-) + dicere, which was usually "to say, declare" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"), but also "adjudge, allot."

"It is a yielding to impulse, and generally a bad one" [Century Dictionary]. Old English glossed Latin addictus literally with forscrifen. Related: Addicted; addicting.

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venal (adj.)
1650s, "capable of being obtained for a price; that can be corrupted;" 1660s, "offered for sale," from French vénal, Old French venel "for sale" (of prostitutes, etc.; 12c.), from Latin venalis "for sale, to be sold; capable of being bribed," from venum (nominative *venus) "for sale," from PIE root *wes- (1) "to buy, sell" (source also of Sanskrit vasnah "purchase money," vasnam "reward," vasnayati "he bargains, haggles;" Greek onos "price paid, purchase," oneisthai "to buy"). Typically with a bad sense of "ready to sell one's services or influence for money and from sordid motives; to be bought basely or meanly."
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vend (v.)
1620s, from Latin vendere "to sell, give for a bribe; praise, cry up," contraction of venumdare "offer for sale," from venum "for sale" (see venal) + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Vended; vending; vendible (early 14c.). Vending machine is recorded from 1889.
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dealer (n.)

Old English dælere "divider, distributor; agent, negotiator," agent noun from deal (v.). Meaning "player who passes out the cards in a game" is from c. 1600; meaning "one whose business is to buy and sell merchandise" is from 1610s. Meaning "purveyor of illegal drugs" is recorded by 1920.

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