Etymology
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alot (n.)

a misdivision of a lot (see lot (n.)), in which sense it begins to turn up in print transcripts c. 1960. It also can be an alternative spelling of allot.

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opsigamy (n.)

"marriage late in life," 1824, from Greek opse "late" (related to opiso "backward," opisthen "behind," from opi, a variant of epi "on it, at it;" see epi-) + -gamy "marriage."

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Deo volente 

1767, Latin, "God willing," that is, "if nothing prevents it, if it is meant to be," a sort of verbal knock on wood, from ablative of Deus "God" (see Zeus) + ablative of volentem, present participle of velle "to wish, will" (see will (v.)). Often abbreviated D.V.

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sea-anemone (n.)

by 1742; see sea + anemone. Another name for it was sea-pudding (1750).

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retardance (n.)

1550s, "slowness, a making slower, retardation," from French retardance, from retarder (see retard (v.)). It seems to persist in reference to resistance to fire, in which sense it dates from 1921. Related: Retardancy.

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dewpoint (n.)

"thermometer temperature when dew begins to be deposited," hence "that temperature of air at which the moisture present in it just saturates it," 1833; see dew + point (n.).

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experto crede 

Latin, "take it from one who knows" ("Aeneid," xi.283); dative singular of expertus (see expert (adj.)) + imperative singular of credere "to believe" (see credo).

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deplane (v.)

"to leave an airplane after it lands," 1923; see de- + plane (n.2). Related: Deplaning.

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bordel (n.)

c. 1300, "brothel," from Old French bordel (see bordello, which has replaced it).

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viz. 

1530s, abbreviation of videlicet "that is to say, to wit, namely" (mid-15c.), from Latin videlicet, contraction of videre licet "it is permissible to see," from videre "to see" (see vision) + licet "it is allowed," third person singular present indicative of licere "be allowed" (see licence). The -z- is not a letter, but originally a twirl, representing the usual Medieval Latin shorthand symbol for the ending -et. "In reading aloud usually rendered by 'namely.' " [OED]

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