Etymology
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sabulous (adj.)

"sandy, gritty," 1630s, from Latin sabulosus "sandy," from sabulum "coarse sand" (see sand (n.)). Related: Sabulosity.

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sac (n.)

"biological pocket or receptacle," 1741, from French sac, from Latin saccus "bag" (see sack (n.1)). English sack for "a sack-like part of the body" is from mid-14c.

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saccade (n.)

"a violent check of a horse by giving a sudden pull on the reins," 1705, from French saccade "a jerk," from obsolete saquer "to shake, pull," a dialectal variant of Old French sachier, which is perhaps ultimately from Latin saccus "sack" (see sack (n.1)). Related: Saccadic.

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saccharin (n.)

white crystalline compound, odorless but intensely sweet, used as a sugar substitute, 1885, from German, coined 1879 by Russian-born chemist Constantin Fahlberg (1850-1910), who discovered it by accident, from Latin saccharon (see saccharine); for ending see -in (2). Marketed from 1887 as saccharine.

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saccharine (adj.)

1670s, "of or like sugar, having the qualities of sugar," from Medieval Latin saccharum "sugar," from Latin saccharon "sugar," from Greek sakkharon, from Pali sakkhara, from Sanskrit sarkara "gravel, grit" (see sugar). The metaphoric sense of "overly sweet" is recorded by 1841. For the sugar substitute, see saccharin. Related: Saccharinity.

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sacerdotal (adj.)

"of or belonging to priests or the priesthood," c. 1400, from Old French sacerdotal and directly from Latin sacerdotalis "of or pertaining to a priest," from sacerdos (genitive sacerdotis) "priest," literally "offerer of sacrifices or sacred gifts," from sacer "holy" (see sacred) + stem of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Sacerdotalism "methods of priests; devotion to the interests of priests," in 19c. often in a bad sense, "priestcraft."

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sachem (n.)

chief of a Native American tribe, 1620s, from Narragansett (Algonquian) sachim "chief, ruler," cognate with Abenaki sangman, Delaware sakima, Micmac sakumow, Penobscot sagumo. Applied in jocular use to a prominent member of any society from 1680s; specific political use in U.S. is by 1890, from its use in New York City as the title of the 12 high officials of the Tammany Society.

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sachet (n.)

1838, "small bag, usually embroidered or otherwise ornamented, containing perfume powder, etc., placed among articles of dress," from French sachet, literally "little sack" (12c.), a diminutive of sac (see sac). A reborrowing of a word that Middle English had used in the sense "small bag, wallet" (15c., saket).

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sack (n.2)

"a dismissal from work," 1825, apparently from sack (n.1), perhaps from the notion of the worker going off with his tools in a bag. The original formula seems to have been give (someone) the sack. In early use sometimes also of a rejected suitor. It is attested earlier in French (on luy a donné son sac, 17c.) and Dutch (iemand de zak geven). English was using bag (v.) in the same sense colloquially by 1848, and compare 20c. slang verbal phrase bag work "skip one's job" which puts the bag to different use. The verb sack "dismiss from office, employment, etc., 'give the sack,' " is attested by 1841 (in sacked).

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