Etymology
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grog (n.)
1749, "alcoholic drink diluted with water," supposedly a reference to Old Grog, nickname of Edward Vernon (1684-1757), British admiral who wore a grogram (q.v.) cloak and who in August 1740 ordered his sailors' rum to be diluted. George Washington's older half-brother Lawrence served under Vernon in the Caribbean and renamed the family's Hunting Creek Plantation in Virginia for him in 1740, calling it Mount Vernon. Eventually the word came popularly to mean "strong drink" of any kind. Grog shop "tavern where alcohol is sold by the glass" is from 1790.
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rumination (n.)

c. 1600, "act of chewing the cud; act of meditating," from Latin ruminationem (nominative ruminatio) "a chewing the cud," noun of action from past-participle stem of ruminare "to chew the cud," also "turn over in the mind" (see ruminate).

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ruminant (n.)

"animal that chews the cud," 1660s, from Latin ruminantem (nominative ruminans), present participle of ruminare "to chew the cud" (see ruminate). As an adjective from 1670s, "ruminating, chewing the cud."

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rumble (n.)

"a deep, heavy, continuous rattling or dully roaring sound," as of thunder, late 14c., from rumble (v.). From 14c. to 17c. it also meant "confusion, disorder, tumult." The slang noun meaning "gang fight" is by 1946. The meaning "backmost part of a carriage" (typically reserved for servants or luggage) is from 1808 (earlier rumbler, 1801), probably from the effect of sitting over the wheels; hence rumble seat (1828), later transferred to automobiles.

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rumor (v.)

1590s, transitive, "spread a rumor; tell by way of report," from rumor (n.). Related: Rumored; rumoring.

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rumple (v.)

"to wrinkle, make uneven," c. 1600, in rumpled, of uncertain origin, perhaps a variant of rimple "to wrinkle" (c. 1400), from Old English hrympel "wrinkle" (possibly influenced by Middle Dutch rumpelen), related to Old English hrimpan "to fold, wrinkle" (see ramp (v.)). Related: Rumpled; rumpling. As a noun from c. 1500, "a wrinkle, a fold."

Also compare Middle English runkle "become wrinkled" (late 14c.), runkel (n.) "a wrinkle" (early 14c.), probably from Old Norse hrukka.

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rumba (n.)

type of Afro-Cuban dance, also a ballroom dance based on it, the rhythm of it, and the music suitable for it; 1914 ("La Rumba" was the name of a popular tango melody from 1913), from Cuban Spanish rumba, originally "spree, carousal," derived from Spanish rumbo "spree, party," earlier "ostentation, pomp, leadership," perhaps originally "the course of a ship," from rombo "rhombus," in reference to the compass, which is marked with a rhombus. The verb is recorded from 1932. Related: Rumbaed; rumbaing.

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rumble (v.)

late 14c., "make a deep, heavy, continuous sound," also "move with a rolling, thundering sound," also "create disorder and confusion," probably related to Middle Dutch rommelen "to rumble," Middle High German rummeln, Old Norse rymja "to shout, roar," all of imitative origin. Slang sense of "engage in a gang-fight" is by 1959. Related: Rumbled; rumbling.

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rumen (n.)

"first stomach of a ruminant," 1728, from Latin rumen "the throat," a word of uncertain origin.

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