Etymology
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Fescennine (adj.)

"vulgar, obscene, scurrilous," from Latin Fescenninus (versus), a rude form of dramatic or satiric verse, from Fescennia, city in Etruria, noted for such productions.

The Fescennine Songs were the origin of the Satire, the only important species of literature not derived from the Greeks, and altogether peculiar to Italy. These Fescennine Songs were rude dialogues, in which the country people assailed and ridiculed one another in extempore verses, and which were introduced as an amusement in various festivals. [William Smith, "A Smaller History of Rome," London, 1870]
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inhuman (adj.)
mid-15c., "cruel," from Latin inhumanus "inhuman, savage, cruel, rude, barbarous, uncultured," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + humanus "human" (see human (adj.)). Spelled inhumane till 18c. (see humane).
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gaff (n.2)
"talk," 1812, in phrase blow the gaff "spill a secret," of uncertain origin. OED points out Old English gafspræc "blasphemous or ribald speech," and Scottish gaff "loud, rude talk" (by 1825). Compare gaffe.
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barbaric (adj.)

late 15c., "uncultured, uncivilized, unpolished," from French barbarique (15c.), from Latin barbaricus "foreign, strange, outlandish," from Greek barbarikos "like a foreigner," from barbaros "foreign, rude" (see barbarian (n.)). Meaning "pertaining to or characteristic of barbarians" is from 1660s. Related: Barbarically.

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romp (n.)

1734, "a piece of lively play," from romp (v.). From 1706 as "a wanton, merry, rude girl," in this sense perhaps a variant of ramp (n.2) suggested by the notion of "girl who indulges in boisterous play."

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roughly (adv.)

c. 1300, roughlie, "ungently, violently," from rough (adj.) + -ly (2). Hence "without much care or skill, in a rude or imperfect way," c. 1600; the meaning "approximately, without precision or exactness" is from 1841.

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Arcadian (adj.)
"ideally rustic or rural;" as a noun, "an idealized rustic," 1580s, from Greek Arkadia, a mountainous district landlocked in the Peloponnesus, regarded by the ancient Greeks as rude, impoverished, and inhospitable, but taken by 16c. European poets as an ideal region of rural felicity. See Arcadia.
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wooly (adj.)
also woolly, 1570s, "resembling or made of wool," from wool + -y (2). Meaning "barbarous, rude" is recorded 1891, from wild and wooly (1884) applied to the U.S. western frontier, perhaps in reference to range steers or to unkempt cowboys. Related: Wooliness.
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bungle (v.)
"to work or act clumsily," 1520s, origin obscure. OED suggests imitative; perhaps a mix of boggle and bumble, or perhaps [Skeat] from a Scandinavian word akin to Swedish bangla "to work ineffectually," Old Swedish bunga "to strike" (related to German Bengel "cudgel," also "rude fellow"). Related: Bungled; bungling.
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surly (adj.)
1570s, "haughty, imperious," alteration of Middle English sirly "lordly, imperious" (14c.), literally "like a sir," from sir + -ly (1). The meaning "rude, gruff" is first attested 1660s. For sense development, compare lordly, and German herrisch "domineering, imperious," from Herr "master, lord." Related: Surliness.
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