Etymology
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gardenia (n.)
shrub genus, 1757, Modern Latin, named for Scottish-born American naturalist Dr. Alexander Garden (1730-1791), Vice President of the Royal Society, + abstract noun ending -ia.
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Stuart 
name of the British royal family from 1603 to 1668; see steward. Attested from 1873 as an attribution for styles from that period.
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Carolingian (adj.)
1881, "belonging to the Frankish royal and imperial dynasty founded by Charles Martel, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Also compare Carlovingian.
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Inca (n.)
1590s, from Spanish Inga (1520s), from Quechea Inca, literally "lord, king." Technically only of the high Inca, but it was used widely among the Incas for "man of royal blood." Related: Incan.
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Ghana 
since 1957 the name of the former Gold Coast; from the name of a former tribal chieftain, whose name itself is a form of a royal title, hence, "king." Related: Ghanian.
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scepter (n.)

"staff of office peculiar to royalty or independent sovereignty," c. 1300, ceptre, from Old French ceptre, sceptre (12c.) and directly from Latin sceptrum "royal staff," from Greek skēptron "staff to lean on," in a Persian and Asian context, "royal scepter," in transferred use, "royalty," from root of skeptein "'to support oneself, lean; pretend something, use as a pretention." Beekes has this from a root *skap- (perhaps non-Indo-European) and compares Latin scapus "shaft, stalk," Albanian shkop "stick, scepter," Old High German skaft, Old Norse skapt, Old English sceaft "shaft, spear, lance" (see shaft (n.1)).

The verb meaning "to furnish with a scepter" is from 1520s; hence "invest with royal authority." Related: Sceptred.

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Infanta (n.)
"daughter of a king of Spain or Portugal," c. 1600, from Spanish and Portuguese infanta, fem. of infante "a youth; a prince of royal blood," from Latin infantem (see infant).
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palatine (adj.)

"possessing quasi-royal privileges," literally "pertaining to a palace," mid-15c., of counties, "ruled by a lord who has privileges resembling those of an independent sovereign," from Old French palatin (15c.) and directly from Medieval Latin palatinus "of the palace" (of the Caesars), from Latin palatium (see palace). Medieval Latin (comes) palatinus was a title given to one holding any office in the palace of a prince, hence "possessing royal privileges." A doublet of paladin.

In reference to the Rhineland state, formerly an electorate in the old German empire, by 1570s; by 1709 as a noun meaning "resident of or immigrant from the (German) Palatine."

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bridewell (n.)

"prison," 1550s, from Bridewell, house of correction in London, originally a royal lodging (built by Henry VIII, given by Edward VI for a hospital, later converted to a prison) near Bride's Well, short for St. Bridget's Well.

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presenter (n.)

mid-15c., presentour, "one who formally introduces a royal personage; one who presents or offers (a document, legal charge, etc.) for acceptance," agent noun from present (v.). The meaning "host of a radio or television program" is from 1967.

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