Etymology
Advertisement
puppeteer (n.)

"one who manages the motions of puppets," 1915, from puppet + -eer. Earlier in the same sense were puppetman (1731); puppet-player (1550s), which also could mean "a mime."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
carol (n.)
c. 1300, "joyful song," also a kind of dance in a ring, from Old French carole "kind of dance in a ring, round dance accompanied by singers," a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Medieval Latin choraula "a dance to the flute," from Latin choraules "flute-player," from Greek khoraules "flute player who accompanies the choral dance," from khoros "chorus" (see chorus) + aulein "to play the flute," from aulos "reed instrument" (see alveolus). OED writes that "a Celtic origin is out of the question." The meaning "Christmas hymn of joy" is attested from c. 1500.
Related entries & more 
turntable (n.)
also turn-table, "circular platform designed to turn upon its center," 1835, originally in the railroad sense, from turn (v.) + table (n.). The record-player sense is attested from 1908.
Related entries & more 
serve (n.)

1680s, in sports (originally tennis), "act of the first player in striking the ball, or the style in which the ball is delivered," from serve (v.). Service in the same sense is attested from 1610s.

Related entries & more 
block (n.2)
"obstruction," 1831, from block (v.1), also in part perhaps an extended sense of block (n.1). As a type of defensive shot in cricket, from 1825; in U.S. football, the act of obstructing another player, from 1912.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
grandstand (n.)

"main seating for spectators at an outdoor event," 1761 (two words), from grand (adj.) + stand (n.). The verb meaning "to show off" is student slang from 1895, from grandstand player, attested in baseball slang from 1888.

It's little things of this sort which makes the 'grand stand player.' They make impossible catches, and when they get the ball they roll all over the field. [M.J. Kelly, "Play Ball," 1888]

Compare British gallery hit (1882) "showy play by a batsman in cricket, 'intended to gain applause from uncritical spectators'" [OED]. Related: grandstanding.

Related entries & more 
file (n.1)

1520s, "string or wire on which documents are strung," from French file "a row" (15c.), noun derived from filer "string documents; spin thread" (see file (v.1)). The literal sense explains why from the beginning until recently things were generally on file (or upon file). The meaning "collection of papers systematically arranged for ready reference" is from 1620s; computer sense is from 1954. The sense "row of persons or things one behind another" (1590s) is originally military, from the French verb in the sense of "march in file." Meaning "line of squares on a chessboard running directly from player to player" is from 1610s.

Related entries & more 
pitcher (n.2)

1722, "one who pitches" in any sense, agent noun from pitch (v.1). Originally of one tossing hay into a wagon, etc. In ball games, "player who serves the ball to the batsman," by 1845.

Related entries & more 
podcast 

"episodic series of spoken-word digital audio files that can be downloaded to a personal device and listened to at leisure," 2004, noun and verb, from pod-, from iPod, brand of portable media player, + second element abstracted from broadcast. Related: Podcasting.

Related entries & more 
Nimzo-Indian (adj.)

type of defensive opening in chess, 1935, in reference to Aron Nimzowitsch (1886-1935), Latvian-born Jewish chess genius who popularized a variation of the Indian defense (1884) attributed to Indian chess player Moheschunder Bannerjee.

Related entries & more 

Page 3