Etymology
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by-path (n.)

"side road," late 14c., from by + path.

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turnpike (n.)

early 15c., "spiked road barrier used for defense," from turn + pike (n.2) "shaft." Sense transferred to "horizontal cross of timber, turning on a vertical pin" (1540s), which were used to bar horses from foot roads. This led to the sense of "barrier to stop passage until a toll is paid" (1670s). Meaning "road with a toll gate" is from 1748, shortening of turnpike road (1745).

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throughway (n.)

"expressway, large toll road," 1934, American English, from through + way (n.).

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blacktop (n.)

road resurfacing material, 1931, American English, from black (adj.) + top (n.1).

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gait (n.)

c. 1300, gate "a going or walking, departure, journey," earlier "way, road, path" (c. 1200), from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse gata "way, road, path"), from Proto-Germanic *gatwon "a going" (source also of Old High German gazza "street," German Gasse "a way, road," Gothic gatwo), perhaps from PIE *ghe- "to release, let go." Meaning "manner of walking, carriage of the body while walking" is from mid-15c. Modern spelling developed before 1750, originally in Scottish. Related: Gaited.

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byway (n.)

"a private, secluded, or out-of-the-way path or road," mid-14c., from by + way (n.).

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autobahn (n.)

"German expressway," 1937, from German Autobahn (1930s), from auto "motor car, automobile" (short for automobil; see auto) + bahn "path, road," from Middle High German ban, bane "way, road," literally "strike" (as a swath cut through), from PIE *gwhen- "to strike, kill" (see bane).

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wayside (n.)

"the side of the road," c. 1400, from way (n.) + side (n.). To fall by the wayside is from Luke viii.5.

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cart-way (n.)

also cartway, "road on which carts may travel," mid-14c., from cart (n.) + way (n.).

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off-ramp (n.)

"sloping one-way road leading off a main highway," 1954, from off- (adj.), from off (prep.), + ramp (n.).

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