Etymology
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surmount (v.)

early 14c., "to rise above, go beyond," from Old French surmonter "rise above," from sur- "beyond" (see sur- (1)) + monter "to go up" (see mount (v.)). Meaning "to prevail over, overcome" is recorded from late 14c. Related: Surmounted; surmounting.

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amount (v.)

late 13c., "to go up, rise, mount (a horse)," from Old French amonter "rise, go up; mean, signify," from amont (adv.) "upward, uphill," literally "to the mountain" (12c.), a contraction of the prepositional phrase a mont, from a (from Latin ad "to;" see ad-) + Latin montem (nominative mons) "mountain" (from PIE root *men- (2) "to project").

The meaning "to rise in number or quality (so as to reach)" is from c. 1300. Compare mount (v.). Related: Amounted; amounting.

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overtop (v.)

"rise above or beyond the top of," 1560s, from over- + top (v.). Related: Overtopped; overtopping.

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billow (v.)

"to rise or roll in large waves," 1590s, from billow (n.). Related: Billowed; billowing.

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hove (v.2)

"to rise up, to swell," 1590s, evidently from heave (v.), perhaps from its past tense form hove.

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sty (n.2)

"inflamed swelling in the eyelid," 1610s, probably a back-formation from Middle English styany (as though sty on eye), mid-15c., from Old English stigend "sty," literally "riser," from present participle of stigan "go up, rise," from Proto-Germanic *stigan, from PIE root *steigh- "to stride, step, rise" (see stair).

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flood (v.)

1660s, "to overflow" (transitive), from flood (n.). Intransitive sense "to rise in a flood" is from 1755. Related: Flooded; flooding.

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surgent (adj.)

"rising in waves," 1590s, from Latin surgentem (nominative surgens) "rising," present participle of surgere "to rise" (see surge (n.)). In psychology from 1933.

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birth (v.)

mid-13c., "be born," from birth (n.). The transitive meaning "give birth to, give rise to" is from 1906. Related: Birthed; birthing.

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sord (n.)

"flock of mallards," 15c., perhaps from sord (v.) "to take flight," from Old French sordre "arise, stand up," from Latin surgere "to rise" (see surge (n.)).

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