Etymology
Advertisement
areola (n.)

"colored circle around a nipple" (areola papillaris), 1706, from Latin areola, literally "small area," diminutive of area (see area). Introduced in this sense 1605 by Swiss anatomist and botanist Caspar Bauhin. The word also is used in other anatomical senses. Related: Areolar.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
disquiet (v.)

"deprive of peace, rest, or tranquility," 1520s, from dis- + quiet (v.). Related: Disquieted; disquieting. As a noun, "want of quiet, rest, or peace," 1580s.

Related entries & more 
restless (adj.)

late 14c., restles, "finding no rest or sleep, unable to rest; uneasy in mind or spirit," from rest (n.1) + -less. A general Germanic compound (Frisian restleas, Dutch rusteloos, German rastlos, Danish rastlös). The meaning "stirring constantly, desirous of action" is attested from late 15c. Related: Restlessly; restlessness. Old English had restleas "deprived of sleep."

Related entries & more 
acquiescence (n.)

1630s, "rest, quiet, satisfaction," from French acquiescence, noun of action from acquiescer "to yield or agree to; be at rest" (see acquiesce). Meaning "silent consent, passive assent" is recorded from 1640s.

Related entries & more 
are (n.)
metric unit of square measure, 10 meters on each side (100 square meters), 1819, from French, formed 1795 by decree of the French National Convention, from Latin area "vacant piece of ground" (see area).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
TriBeCa 
1983, area in Manhattan between Broadway and the Hudson, south of Greenwich Village, from "triangle below Canal (Street)."
Related entries & more 
quiet (adj.)

late 14c., "peaceable, being in a state of rest, restful, tranquil, not moving or agitated," from Old French quiet and directly from Latin quietus "calm, at rest, free from exertion," from quies (genitive quietis) "rest" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From 1510s as "peaceable, not turbulent, characterized by absence of commotion." By 1590s as "making no noise." From 1570s as "private, secret." As an adverb from 1570s. Quiet American, frequently meaning a U.S. undercover agent or spy, is from the title of Graham Greene's 1955 novel. Related: Quietly; quietness.

Related entries & more 
*kweie- 
*kweiə-, also *kwyeə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to rest, be quiet."

It forms all or part of: acquiesce; acquit; awhile; coy; quiesce; quiescent; quiet; quietism; quietude; quietus; quit; quitclaim; quite; quit-rent; quittance; requiescat; requiem; requite; while; whilom.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Avestan shaitish "joy," shaiti- "well-being," shyata- "happy;" Old Persian šiyatish "joy;" Latin quies "rest, repose, quiet;" Old Church Slavonic po-koji "rest;" Old Norse hvild "rest."
Related entries & more 
quiescent (adj.)

c. 1600, of a letter, "not sounded," from Latin quiescentem (nominative quiescens), present participle of quiescere, inchoative verb formed from quies "rest, quiet" (from suffixed form of PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). From 1640s as "resting, being in a state of repose." Related: Quiescently.

Related entries & more 
futon (n.)
1876, from Japanese, said to mean "bedroll" or "place to rest."
Related entries & more 

Page 3