Etymology
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mourn (v.)

Middle English mornen, from Old English murnan "to feel or express sorrow, grief, or regret; bemoan, long after," also "be anxious about, be careful" (class III strong verb; past tense mearn, past participle murnen), from Proto-Germanic *murnan "to remember sorrowfully" (source also of Old Saxon mornon, Old High German mornen, Gothic maurnan "to mourn," Old Norse morna "to pine away"), probably from suffixed form of PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember." Or, if the Old Norse sense is the base one, from *mer- "to die, wither."

Specifically, "to lament the death of" from c. 1300. Meaning "display the conventional appearance of grieving for a period following the death of someone" is from 1520s. Related: Mourned; mourning.

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commemorate (v.)

1590s, "call to remembrance," from Latin commemoratus, past participle of commemorare "bring to remembrance," from com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + memorare "to remind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

Meaning "perpetuate the memory of" (by solemn act, etc.) is from 1630s. Of things, "to serve as a memento of, to perpetuate the memory of," 1766. Related: Commemorated; commemorates; commemorating.

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roller-coaster (n.)

also rollercoaster, and originally roller coaster, by 1884, from roller + coaster. As a verb by 1959.

Men not yet very old can remember when the street railway was a curiosity, patronized at first very much as the roller coaster is now, for the novelty of the thing. [editorial in St. Paul Pioneer-Press, Aug. 17, 1884]
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recordation (n.)

late 14c., recordacioun, "faculty of remembering," from Old French recordacion "record, memory" (14c.) and directly from Latin recordationem (nominative recordatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of recordari "to remember, be mindful of" (see record (v.)). The meaning "act or process of committing to writing" is from mid-15c., but might have grown obsolete and been revived or recoined by Bentham c. 1810.

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mnemonic (adj.)

1753, "aiding the memory, intended to assist the memory;" 1825, "pertaining to the memory," a back-formation from mnemonics, or from a Latinized form of Greek mnēmonikos "of or pertaining to memory," from mnēmōn (genitive mnēmonos) "remembering, mindful," from mnēmē "memory, a remembrance, record, an epitaph; memory as a mental faculty," from base of mnasthai "remember," from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." The noun meaning "mnemonic device" is from 1858. Related: Mnemonical (1660s).

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commemoration (n.)

late 14c., "a calling to mind," also "service or church festival commemorating something," from Old French comemoration, from Latin commemorationem (nominative commemoratio) "reminding, mention," noun of action from past participle stem of commemorare "to call to mind," from com-, here as an intensive prefix (see com-), + memorare "to remind," from memor "mindful of" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember").

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amnesia (n.)
"loss of memory," 1786 (as a Greek word in English from 1670s), Modern Latin, coined from Greek amnesia "forgetfulness," from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + mnesi- "remembering" (found only in compounds), from stem of mnasthai "to recall, remember," related to mnemnon "mindful," mneme "memory;" from PIE root *men- (1) "to think." The usual word in Greek was amnestia, but this had a specialized sense of "forgetfulness of wrong" (see amnesty).
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memorial (adj.)

late 14c., "memorable, excellent," also "remembered, committed to memory," from Old French memorial "mindful of, remembering" (Modern French mémorial), and directly from Latin memorialis "of or belonging to memory," from memoria "memory" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (1) "to remember"). From mid-15c. as "preservative of memory, serving for commemoration."

A Middle English word for "having to do with memory" was memorative (late 14c.), from Old French memoratif, from Latin memorativus. Though useful, it apparently has not survived.

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creampuff (n.)

also cream-puff, by 1859 as a kind of light confection, from cream (n.) + puff (n.). In figurative sense of "ineffectual person, weakling, sissy," it is recorded by 1935.

I remember my first campaign. My opponent called me a cream puff. That's what he said. Well, I rushed out and got the baker's union to endorse me. [Sen. Claiborne Pell, D-R.I., 1987]

As a salesman's word, "something that is a tremendous bargain," it is from 1940s.

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monotonic (adj.)

in music, etc., "of or pertaining to a single, unvarying note," 1797; see mono- + tonic (adj.). Related: Monotonically.

The secondary sense of monotonous (same or tedious) has so nearly swallowed up its primary (of one pitch or tone) that it is well worth while to remember the existence of monotonic, which has the primary sense only. [Fowler, 1926]
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