Etymology
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remise (n.)

"coach house, house or shelter for a carriage," 1690s, from French remise, noun use of past participle of remettre "to send back," from Latin remittere (see remit). Also from 1690s as "better sort of hired carriage" (voiture de remise). Also in fencing, "a second thrust while still on the lunge after the first has missed," 1823; hence its use in card games, etc.

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remarry (v.)

also re-marry, "marry again or a second time," also transitive, "to unite again in marriage," 1520s, from re- "back, again" + marry (v.). Related: Remarried; remarrying.

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remote (adj.)

mid-15c., "distant in place, apart, removed, not near," from Latin remotus "afar off, remote, distant in place," past participle of removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away"). Related: Remotely; remoteness.

The meaning "distant" in any sense is from 1590s; by 1711 as "slight, inconsiderable" (of resemblances, chances, etc.). Remote control "fact of controlling from a distance" is recorded from 1904; as a device which allows this from 1920.

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remove (v.)

early 14c., remouven, remuvien, remēven, "take (something) away; dismiss" from an office, post or situation; from Old French removoir "move, stir; leave, depart; take away," from Latin removere "move back or away, take away, put out of view, subtract," from re- "back, away" (see re-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

Sense of "go away, leave, depart, move" from a position occupied is from late 14c.; the intransitive sense of "change (one's) place, move from one place to another" also is from 14c. Related: Removed; removing.

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removable (adj.)

early 15c., remevable, "capable of being removed" from an office or station; 1530s as "capable of being moved from one place to another;" from remove (v.) + -able. Related: Removability.

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remoulade (n.)

type of French salad dressing, 1845, from French rémoulade (17c.), from remolat, a dialect word for "horseradish;" compare Italian ramolaccio "horseradish," by dissimilation from ramoraccio, from Latin armoracia. "horseradish," from Greek armorakia.

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remove (n.)

1550s, "act of removing" (a person, from office, etc.); 1580s, "change of place;" from remove (v.). Sense of "distance or space by which any thing is removed from another" is attested from 1620s.

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rematerialize (v.)

also re-materialize, "materialize again," 1871, from re- "again" + materialize. Related: Rematerialized; rematerializing; rematerialization.

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remissive (adj.)

1610s, "inclined to pardon;" 1680s, "causing or characterized by abatement," from Latin remissivus, from past-participle stem of remittere "slacken, abate" (see remit). Related: Remissively.

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remittent (adj.)

"temporarily abating, having remissions from time to time," 1690s, originally of fevers, from Latin remittentem (nominative remittens), present participle of remittere "slacken, abate" (see remit (v.)).

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