Etymology
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religieuse (n.)

"a nun, a religious woman," 1690s, from French religieuse, fem. of religieux "monk, religious person" (itself used in English from 1650s but much less common), noun use of the adjective meaning "religious" (see religious). As a type of pastry, attested from 1929.

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Hanbali 
Sunni school or sect in Islam, from Arabic, from the name of founder Ahmad ibn Hanbal (780-855).
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sept (n.)

"enclosed area," 1540s, from Latin septum (see septum). As "division of a nation or tribe," 1510s, it is apparently a different word, "prob. a var. of sect" [OED].

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Hanafi 
Sunni school or sect in Islam, from Arabic, from the name of founder Abu Hanifah of Kufa (c. 700-770).
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Shia (n.)
also Shiah, 1620s, a collective name for one of the two great Muslim sects, from Arabic shi'ah "partisans, followers, sect, company, faction" (from sha'a "to follow"). This is the proper use, but it commonly is used in English to mean "a Shiite." In Arabic, shi'ah is the name of the sect, shiya'iy is a member of the sect.

The branch of Islam that recognizes Ali, Muhammad's son-in-law, as the lawful successor of the Prophet; the minority who believed, after the death of the Prophet, that spiritual and political authority followed his family line, as opposed to the Sunni, who took Abu Bakr as the political leader of the community. The Arabic name is short for Shi'at Ali "the party of Ali."
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Maronite 

sect of Syrian Christians, originally Monothelites, subsequently (1216) united with the Catholic Church; 1510s, from Late Latin Maronita, from Maron, name of the 4c. Syrian monk who was the founder.

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irreligious (adj.)

"not religious, without religious principles; condemning religion, impious, ungodly," c. 1400, from Late Latin irreligiosus "irreligious, impious," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + religiosus (see religious). Related: Irreligiously.

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religiously (adv.)

late 14c., religiousli, "piously, devoutly, in a religious manner," from religious + -ly (2). Transferred sense of "exactly, strictly, scrupulously" is attested by 1570s.

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sacrosanct (adj.)

"superlatively sacred or inviolable," c. 1600, from Latin sacrosanctus "inviolable, protected by religious sanction, consecrated with religious ceremonies," from sacro, ablative of sacrum "religious sanction, religious rite" (from neuter singular of sacer "sacred") + sanctus, past participle of sancire "make sacred" (for both, see sacred). Earlier in partially Englished form sacro-seint (c. 1500).

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religiosity (n.)

late 14c., religiosite, "religious feeling, reverence for God, piety," from Old French religiosete and directly from Late Latin religiositas "religiousness," from religiosus "pious, devout, reverencing or fearing the gods," also "religiously careful, anxious, or scrupulous" (see religious). In late 19c. especially "religious sentimentality, excessive susceptibility to religious emotion without corresponding regard for divine law."

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