Etymology
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priestess (n.)

"woman who officiates in sacred rites, a female minister of religion," 1690s, from priest + -ess. Earlier was priestress (mid-15c. prēsteresse).

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Brahma 
1785, from Sanskrit Brahma, nominative of Brahman, chief god of the trinity Brahma-Vishnu-Siva in post-Vedic Hindu religion (see brahmin).
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unbeliever (n.)
"one who does not believe in any given religion," 1520s, from un- (1) "not" believer. Old English had ungelifend in this sense.
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lingam (n.)
in Hindu religion, "phallic emblem under which Siva is worshipped," 1719, from Sanskrit linga (nominative lingam) "mark, token, sign, emblem," a word of unknown origin.
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big-tent (adj.)
in reference to welcoming all sorts and not being ideologically or theologically narrow, American English, 1982 with reference to religion, by 1987 with reference to politics.
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anythingarian (n.)
"one indifferent to religious creeds, one 'that always make their interest the standard of their religion,'" 1704, originally dismissive, from anything on model of trinitarian, unitarian, etc.
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Christianism (n.)

1570s, "Christianity, the Christian religion," from Christian + -ism. Obsolete, but revived or recoined c. 2004 in reference to politicized fundamentalist Christianity in the U.S. Related: Christianist.

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Bel 
also in Latin form Belus, heaven-and-earth god of Babylonian religion, from Akkadian Belu, literally "lord, owner, master," cognate with Hebrew ba'al (see Baal).
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nonconforming (adj.)

also non-conforming, "failing or refusing to conform," 1640s, from non- + conforming (see conform). Originally in religion, "refusing to follow the forms and regulations of the Church of England;" see nonconformist.

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proselytize (v.)

1670s, "to make proselytes," from proselyte + -ize. The transitive sense of "convert (someone) to some religion, doctrine, etc.," is by 1796. Related: Proselytized; proselytizing. The earlier verb form was simply proselyte (1620s).

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