Etymology
Advertisement
fidelity (n.)

early 15c., "faithfulness, devotion," from Old French fidélité (15c.), from Latin fidelitatem (nominative fidelitas) "faithfulness, adherence, trustiness," from fidelis "faithful, true, trusty, sincere," from fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). From 1530s as "faithful adherence to truth or reality;" specifically of sound reproduction from 1878.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
naturalism (n.)

1630s, "action based on natural instincts," from natural (adj.) + -ism. In philosophy, as a view of the world and humanity's relationship to it involving natural forces only (and excluding spiritualism and superstition), from 1750. As a tendency in art and literature, "conformity to nature or reality, but without slavish fidelity to it," from 1850.

Related entries & more 
indeed (adv.)

c. 1600, a contraction into one word of the prepositional phrase in dede "in fact, in truth, in reality" (early 14c.), from Old English dæd "a doing, act, action, event" (see deed (n.)). As an interjection, 1590s; as an expression of surprise or disgust, 1834. Emphatic form yes (or no) indeedy attested from 1856, American English.

Related entries & more 
substantial (adj.)
mid-14c., "ample, sizeable," from Old French substantiel (13c.) and directly from Latin substantialis "having substance or reality, material," in Late Latin "pertaining to the substance or essence," from substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Meaning "existing, having real existence" is from late 14c. Meaning "involving an essential part or point" is early 15c. Related: Substantially.
Related entries & more 
color (v.)

late 14c., colouren, "to make (something) a certain color, to give or apply color to," also figurative "to use (words) to a certain effect; to make (something) appear different from reality or better than it is," from Old French culurer, colorer, and directly from Latin colorare, from color (see color (n.)). Intransitive sense "become red in the face" is from 1721. Related: Colored; coloring.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dummy (n.)

1590s, "mute person," from dumb (adj.) + -y (3). Extended by 1845 to "figure representing a person," hence "counterfeit object, something that imitates a reality for mechanical purposes." In card games (originally whist, later bridge) "exposed hand of cards placed face-up," by 1736. Meaning "dolt, blockhead" is from 1796.

Related entries & more 
externalize (v.)

"to embody in an outward form; convey the quality of external reality upon," 1846, from external + -ize. Related: Externalized; externalizing.

Self-government begins with a reverential recognition of a supreme law: its process is a constant endeavor to render that law objective, real, operative—to externalize it, if we may use the term. [American Review, July, 1846]
Related entries & more 
actually (adv.)
early 15c., "in fact, in reality" (as opposed to "in possibility"), from actual + -ly (2). Meaning "actively, vigorously" is from mid-15c.; that of "at this time, at present" is from 1660s. As an intensive added to a statement and suggesting "as a matter of fact, really, in truth" it is attested from 1762, often used as an expression of mild wonder or surprise.
Related entries & more 
realize (v.)

1610s, "bring into existence, make or cause to become real," also "exhibit the actual existence of," from French réaliser "make real" (16c.), from real "actual" (see real (adj.)). The sense of "understand clearly, comprehend the reality of" is recorded by 1775. Sense of "obtain, amass, bring or get into actual possession" (money, profit, etc.) is from 1753. Related: Realized; realizing.

Related entries & more 
paper (adj.)

1590s, "made of paper, consisting of paper," from paper (n.). Figurative of something flimsy or unsubstantial from 1716, probably on the notion of "appearing merely in written or printed statements, not tangible or existing in reality." Paper tiger (1952) translates Chinese tsuh lao fu, popularized by Mao Zedong. Paper doll is attested by 1817; paper plate "disposable plate made of paper or cardboard" is from 1723. Paper money is from 1690s.

Related entries & more 

Page 3