Etymology
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solipsism (n.)
1871, coined from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)) + ipse "self." The view or theory that self is the only object of real knowledge or the only thing that is real. "The identification of one's self with the Absolute is not generally intended, but the denial of there being really anybody else" [Century Dictionary].
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faction (n.2)
"fictional narrative based on real characters or events, 1967, a blend of fact and fiction.
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unfeigned (adj.)
late 14c., "sincere, genuine, true, real," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of feign (v.).
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seeming (adj.)

"that appears to be (real, proper, etc.), apparent to the senses or mind, having a semblance or appearance of being real," mid-14c., present-participle adjective from seem. Also "suitable, becoming" (mid-14c.), but this is obsolete. Seemingly in the sense of "to all appearances" is recorded from 1590s; earlier it meant "fittingly, properly, in the correct manner" (early 15c.).

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leasehold (n.)
also lease-hold, "a tenure by lease, real estate held under a lease," 1720, from lease (n.) + hold (n.). Related: Leaseholder.
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millage (n.)

"rate of (real estate) taxation in mills per dollar of assessed value," 1871, U.S., from mill (n.2) + -age.

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etymon (n.)
"primitive word," 1570s, from Greek etymon, neuter of etymos "true, real, actual" (see etymology). Classical Greek used etymon as an adverb, "truly, really." Related: Etymic.
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ostensible (adj.)

1730, "capable of being shown, that can be shown or seen, presentable," from French ostensible, from Latin ostens-, past-participle stem of ostendere "to show, expose to view; to stretch out, spread before; exhibit, display," from assimilated form of ob "in front of" (see ob-) + tendere "to stretch," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Meaning "apparent, professed, put forth or held out as real" is from 1771.

Ostensible is, literally, that may be or is held out as true, real, actual, or intended, but may or may not be so: thus, a person's ostensible motive for some action is the motive that appears to the observer, and is held out to him as the real motive, which it may or may not be. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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time-sharing (n.)
1953, as a computing term, from time (n.) + verbal noun from share (v.). In real estate, as an arrangement in property use, it is recorded from 1976.
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woody (adj.)
late 14c., "overgrown with trees and shrubs," from wood (n.) + -y (2). Of plants, "having a stem of wood," from 1570s. Related: Woodiness. Old English had wudulic. As a name for a kind of station wagon with wood panels, by 1961, U.S. surfer slang (real wood exterior panels were rare after 1951 and the last use of real wood was in the 1953 Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon). Slang meaning "erection" attested by 1990 (for hardness).
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