Etymology
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huffy (adj.)

"puffed with pride or arrogance, ready to take offense," 1670s, from huff (n.) + -y (2). Related: Huffily; huffiness. Huffish "petulant, ill-humored" is from 1755.

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mix (n.)

1580s, "act or result of mixing," from mix (v.). By 1882 as "a mixture, a jumble;" 1938 as "ingredients mixed together and sold ready for cooking."

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repertoire (n.)

"a stock of plays, songs, etc., which a performer or company has studied and is ready to perform," 1847, from French répertoire, literally "index, list" (14c.), from Late Latin repertorium "inventory" (see repertory).

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tap (n.1)

"stopper, faucet through which liquid can be drawn," Old English tæppa "tap, spigot," from Proto-Germanic *tappon (source also of Middle Dutch tappe, Dutch tap, Old High German zapfo, German Zapfe). Originally a tapering cylindrical peg for a cask, then a hollowed one to draw from it (compare sense evolution of spigot). Phrase on tap "ready for use, ready to be drawn and served" is recorded from late 15c. Tap-wrench, used in turning one, attested from 1815.

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hegemonic (adj.)

"ruling, predominant, supreme," 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek hēgemonikos "ready to lead, capable of command," from hēgemon "leader, an authority" (see hegemony). Earlier in same sense was hegemonical (1610s).

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expeditious (adj.)

late 15c., expedycius "useful, fitting," from Latin expeditus "disengaged, ready, convenient, prompt; unfettered, unencumbered," past participle of expedire (see expedite). Meaning "speedy, speedily accomplished" is from 1590s. Related: Expeditiously; expeditiousness.

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preparative (adj.)

"serving or tending to prepare the way or make ready for something to follow," c. 1400, preparatif, from Old French preparatif and directly from Medieval Latin preparativus, from stem of Latin praeparare (see prepare).

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pronto (adv.)

"promptly, soon, quickly," 1850, from Spanish pronto "ready, prompt," from Latin promptus (see prompt (v.)). The Italian cognate of the Spanish word, pronto, had been used in English by 1740 in musical instructions.

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list (n.4)

c. 1200, "pleasure, enjoyment;" mid-13c., "desire, wish, will, choice," from list (v.4). Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) "pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick" (mid-15c.).

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harness (v.)

"to put a harness on a draught animal," c. 1300, from Old French harneschier "make ready, equip, arm," from harnois (see harness (n.)); figurative sense "to control for use as power" is from 1690s. Related: Harnessed; harnessing.

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