Etymology
Advertisement
non-smoker (n.)

also nonsmoker, 1836, "person who does not smoke tobacco," from non- + smoker. Meaning "non-smoking compartment in a railway car" is by 1901. Non-smoking is attested by 1826.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Metro (n.)

Paris underground, 1904, from French abbreviation of Chemin de Fer Métropolitain "Metropolitan Railway" (see metropolitan (adj.)). French chemin de fer "railroad" is literally "iron road." Construction began in 1898.

Related entries & more 
subway (n.)
1825, "underground passage" (for water pipes or pedestrians, later for electrical wires), from sub- + way (n.). The sense of "underground railway in a city" is first recorded 1892, in reference to London.
Related entries & more 
gauge (n.)

early 15c., "fixed standard of measure" (surname Gageman is early 14c.), from Old North French gauge "gauging rod" (see gauge (v.)). Meaning "instrument for measuring" is from 1670s; meaning "distance between rails on a railway" is from 1841.

Railway-gage, the distance between perpendiculars on the insides of the heads of the two rails of a track. Standard gage is 4 feet 8 1/2 inches; anything less than this is narrow gage; anything broader is broad gage. The dimension was fixed for the United States by the wheels of the British locomotive imported from the Stephenson Works in 1829. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
cloak-room (n.)

also cloakroom, 1827, "a room connected with an assembly-hall, opera-house, etc., where cloaks and other articles are temporarily deposited," from cloak (n.) + room (n.). Later extended to railway offices for temporary storage of luggage, and by mid-20c. sometimes a euphemism for "bathroom, lavatory."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
funicular (adj.)
1660s, from funicle "a small cord" (1660s), from Latin funiculus "a slender rope," diminutive of funis "a cord, rope," of unknown etymology. De Vaan suggests it is a derivative of the root of filum. A funicular railway (1874) is one worked by a cable from a stationary engine.
Related entries & more 
highball (n.)
type of alcoholic drink, 1898, probably from ball "drink of whiskey;" high (adj.) because it is served in a tall glass. The word also was in use around the same time as railway jargon for the signal to proceed (originally by lifting a ball).
Related entries & more 
derail (v.)

1850 (Dionysius Lardner, "Railway Economy"), in both transitive and intransitive senses, "cause to leave the rails or run off the tracks; to run off the rails or tracks," from French dérailler "to go off the rails," from de- (see de-) + railler (see rail (n.1)). Related: Derailed; derailing.

Related entries & more 
double-header (n.)

1869, American English, in early use a kind of fireworks, also a railway train pulled by two engines (or pulled by one, pushed by the other), 1878; see double (adj.) + head (n.). Baseball sense of "two games between the same teams played in the same place on the same day" is by c. 1890.

Related entries & more 
diner (n.)

1815, "one who dines," agent noun from dine. Meaning "railway car for eating" is 1890, American English; of restaurants built to resemble dining cars (or in some cases actual converted dining cars) from 1935. The Diner's Club credit card system dates from 1952.

Related entries & more 

Page 3