Etymology
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samadhi (n.)

"intense esoteric meditation through yoga," 1827, earlier "state of union with creation" (1795), from Sanskrit samadhi-, literally "a putting or joining together," from sam- "together" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + a- "toward" + stem of dadhati "puts, places" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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perambulate (v.)

"walk through, about, or over," 1560s, from Latin perambulatus, past participle of perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Perambulated; perambulating.

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pervade (v.)

"to pass or flow through; to extend or diffuse (itself) throughout," 1650s, from Latin pervadere "spread or go through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + vadere "to go" (see vamoose). Related: Pervaded; pervading; pervasion.

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impervious (adj.)

1640s, from Latin impervius "not to be traverse, that cannot be passed through, impassible," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + pervius "letting things through, that can be passed through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + via "road" (see via (adv.)). Related: Imperviously; imperviousness.

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permeant (adj.)

"passing through," 1640s, from Latin permeantem (nominative permeans), present participle of permeare "to pass through" (see permeable).

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perambulation (n.)

mid-15c., perambulacioun, "a journey or tour of inspection," especially a walk around the borders of a property, parish, etc., to determine the boundaries, from Anglo-Latin (c. 1300) and Anglo-French perambulacion, from Medieval Latin perambulationem (nominative perambulatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Meaning "act of passing or wandering through or over" is by late 15c.

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percolation (n.)

"the act of straining or filtering through some porous material," 1610s, from Latin percolationem (nominative percolatio) "a straining through; the act of filtering," noun of action from past-participle stem of percolare "to strain through, filter," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + colare "to strain," from colum "a strainer," which is of uncertain origin.

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permeate (v.)

"to pass into or through without rupture or displacement," 1650s, from Latin permeatus, past participle of permeare "to pass through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + meare "to pass," from PIE root *mei- (1) "to change, go, move." Related: Permeated; permeating.

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perforate (v.)

"bore through, pierce, make a hole or holes in," late 15c. (implied in perforated), a back-formation from perforation or else from Latin perforatus, past participle of perforare "to bore through, pierce through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + forare "to pierce" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole"). Related: Perforating.

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percolate (v.)

1620s, "to strain through" (transitive), a back-formation from percolation, or else from Latin percolatus, past participle of percolare "to strain through." Figurative sense by 1670s. Intransitive sense of "to pass through small interstices" is from 1680s. Related: Percolated; percolating.

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