Etymology
Advertisement
one-time (adj.)

"that was, former," by 1850, from one + time (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
one-horse (adj.)

"small-scale, petty" 1853, American English, colloquial, in reference to towns; see one + horse (n.). Probably from earlier use in reference to a carriage, sleigh, plow, etc., "drawn by a single horse" (1750); also "possessing only one horse" (of a farmer); hence "petty, on a small scale, of limited capacity or resources; inferior."

Shortly afterwards I took a stroll over the town. It was what is generally denominated a "one horse town," and I would think a pretty small pony at that. Two stores, one grocery, a stable, and four dwellings made up the sum of its buildings. ["Daguerreotyping in the Back Woods," in Yankee Notions, March, 1855]
Related entries & more 
one-shot (adj.)

1907, "achieved in a single attempt" (original reference is to golf), from one + shot (n.). Meaning "happening or of use only once" is from 1937.

Related entries & more 
one-way (adj.)

1824, "leading in one direction only;" by 1887 in reference to travel tickets or fares; 1914 in reference to streets; 1940 in reference to windows, mirrors, etc.; from one + way (n.).

Related entries & more 
one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
one-of-a-kind (adj.)

"unique," 1961, from the adverbial phrase; see one + kind (n.).

Related entries & more 
one-stop (adj.)

1914, of airplane flights, "making a single stop along the way," from one + stop (n.). Of commercial establishments, "able to supply all of a customer's needs," by 1931. 

Related entries & more 
put-down (n.)

"insult, snub," 1962, from verbal phrase put down "to snub," attested from c. 1400 in this sense, earlier (c. 1300) "to lower, let down," also (mid-14c.) "to throw down, reject;" see put (v.) + down (adv.). To put (something) down "end by force or authority" (a rebellion, etc.) is from mid-14c.  Compare set-down "a rebuff, a scolding" (1780).

Related entries & more 
get over (v.)

1680s, "overcome," from get (v.) + over (adv.). From 1712 as "recover from;" 1813 as "have done with."

Related entries & more 
stop-over (n.)

also stopover, 1881, from the verbal phrase, from stop (v.) + over (adv.).

Related entries & more 

Page 3