Etymology
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bumble (v.)

"to flounder, blunder," 1530s, probably of imitative origin. Related: Bumbled; bumbler; bumbling. Bumble-puppy (1801) was a name for various outdoor sports and games.

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loving (n.)

"love, friendship," also "sexual love," late 14c., verbal noun from love (v.).

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amatory (adj.)

1590s, "pertaining to love, expressive of love" (especially sexual love), from Latin amatorius "loving, amorous," from amat-, past-participle stem of amare "to love" (see Amy). Related: Amatorial.

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amorous (adj.)

c. 1300, "in love; inclined to love; sexually attracted," from Old French amoros "loving, in love; lovely" (13c., Modern French amoureux), from Late Latin amorosum, from Latin amor "love, affection, strong friendly feeling; one's beloved," from amare "to love, be in love with; find pleasure in" (see Amy). Related: Amorously; amorousness.

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lovestruck (adj.)

also love-struck, by 1762, from love (n.) + struck, from strike (v.). Love-stricken is attested from 1805.

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pup (n.)

1760, "young dog," shortened form of puppy (q.v.). Used earlier (from 1580s) for "conceited person," from the figurative sense of puppy. An English-Latin wordbook from late 15c. for Latin pupa gives English pup-bairn. Applied to the young of the fur seal from 1815. Used for "inexperienced person" by 1890.

Pup tent (also dog tent) as a type of small tent used in the military is from 1863. Sopwith pup, popular name of the Sopwith Scout Tractor airplane, is from 1917.

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loveless (adj.)

early 14c., "feeling no love;" late 14c. "unloved, not attracting love," from love (n.) + -less. Attested from mid-13c. as a surname. Related: Lovelessly; lovelessness.

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philtre (n.)

also philter, "love potion, potion supposed to have the power of exciting sexual love," 1580s, from French philtre (1560s), from Latin philtrum (plural philtra) "love potion," from Greek philtron "a love-charm," properly philētron, literally "to make oneself beloved," from philein "to love" (from philos "loving;" see philo-) + instrumental suffix -tron.

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amour (n.)

c. 1300, "love," from Old French amor "love, affection, friendship; loved one" (11c.), from Latin amor "love, affection, strong friendly feeling" (sometimes used of feelings for sons or brothers, but it especially meant sexual love), from amare "to love" (see Amy). The accent shifted 15c.-17c. to the first syllable as the word became nativized, then shifted back as the sense "illicit love affair" became primary 17c. and the word was felt to be an imported euphemism.

A common ME word for love, later accented ámour (cf. enamour). Now with suggestion of intrigue and treated as a F[rench] word. [Weekley]
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Eros (n.)

god of love, late 14c., from Greek eros (plural erotes), "god or personification of love; (carnal) love," from eran, eramai, erasthai "to desire," which is of uncertain origin. Beekes suggests it is from Pre-Greek.

The Freudian sense of "urge to self-preservation and sexual pleasure" is from 1922. Ancient Greek distinguished four ways of love: erao "to be in love with, to desire passionately or sexually;" phileo "have affection for;" agapao "have regard for, be contented with;" and stergo, used especially of the love of parents and children or a ruler and his subjects.

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