Etymology
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pow 

expression imitative of a punch, shot, collision, etc., by 1881, originally American English (Joel Chandler Harris).

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buffet (v.)
c. 1200, "to strike with the fist or hand; cuff, box, slap;" from Old French bufeter "to strike, slap, punch," from bufet "a slap, a punch" (see buffet (n.2)). Related: Buffeted; buffeting.
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mortar (n.1)

"mixture of cement, material used (in building) for binding together stones or bricks," mid-13c., from Old French mortier "builder's mortar, plaster; bowl for mixing" (13c.) and directly from Latin mortarium "mortar, mixture of lime and sand," also "crushed drugs," which probably is the same word as mortarium "bowl for mixing or pounding" (see mortar (n.2)), with the sense transferred from the bowl to the material prepared in it. Dutch mortel, German Mörtel are from Latin or French.

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bowler (n.2)
"player at bowls," c. 1500; in cricket, the player who serves the ball. Agent noun from bowl (v.).
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punchy (adj.2)
"full of vigor," 1926, from punch (n.3) + -y (2). Related: Punchily; punchiness.
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bowling (n.)
1530s, "the act of playing at bowls," verbal noun from bowl (v.). Bowling-alley is from 1550s; bowling-green is from 1640s.
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mortar (n.2)

"bowl for pounding, vessel in which substances are beaten to powder by means of a pestle," c. 1200, from Old French mortier "bowl; builder's mortar" and directly from Latin mortarium "bowl for mixing or pounding," also used of the material prepared in it, a word of unknown origin as it is impossible now to determine which sense was original. Watkins says probably from PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm;" de Vaan finds this plausible. Late Old English had mortere, from the same Latin source, which might also be a source of the modern word. German Mörser also is from Latin.

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Judy 
pet form of Judith. Figurative uses often are from the Punch and Judy puppet show.
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skoal (interj.)
also skol, Scandinavian toasting word, c. 1600, from Danish skaal "a toast," literally "bowl, cup," from Old Norse skal "bowl, drinking vessel," originally a cup made from a shell, from Proto-Germanic *skelo, from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut." The word first appears in Scottish English, and may have been connected to the visit of James VI of Scotland to Denmark in 1589.
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punching (n.)

c. 1400, "the cutting out of figures;" early 15c. as "the action of delivering blows with the fist," verbal noun from punch (v.). Related: Punching-bag "bag, generally large and heavy, suspended from the ceiling to be punched by an athlete, especially a boxer, for training or exercise" is by 1889 (also punch-bag); the figurative sense is attested by 1903.

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