Etymology
Advertisement
bootstrap (n.)

also boot-strap, tab or loop at the back of the top of a men's boot, which the wearer hooked a finger through to pull the boots on, 1870, from boot (n.1) + strap (n.).

To pull (oneself) up by (one's) bootstraps, by 1871, was used figuratively of an impossible task (among the "practical questions" at the end of chapter one of Steele's "Popular Physics" schoolbook (1888) is, "30. Why can not a man lift himself by pulling up on his boot-straps?"). But it also is used to suggest "better oneself by rigorous, unaided effort." The meaning "fixed sequence of instructions to load the operating system of a computer" (1953) is from the notion of the first-loaded program pulling itself (and the rest) up by the bootstrap. It was used earlier of electrical circuits (1946).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
saccade (n.)

"a violent check of a horse by giving a sudden pull on the reins," 1705, from French saccade "a jerk," from obsolete saquer "to shake, pull," a dialectal variant of Old French sachier, which is perhaps ultimately from Latin saccus "sack" (see sack (n.1)). Related: Saccadic.

Related entries & more 
detraction (n.)

mid-14c., detraccioun, "the vice of slandering;" late 14c., "act of disparaging or belittling, act of depreciating the powers or performance of another;" from Old French detraccion "detraction, disparagement, denigration" (12c.) and directly from Latin detractionem (nominative detractio) "a drawing off," from past-participle stem of detrahere "take down, pull down, disparage," from de "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)).

Related entries & more 
detractor (n.)

"one who takes away from or injures the good name of another," late 14c., from Anglo-French detractour, Old French detractor "detractor, backbiter" and directly from Latin detractor, agent noun from detrahere "take down, pull down, disparage," from de "down" (see de-) + trahere "to pull" (see tract (n.1)).  The fem. form detractress is attested from 1716 (Addison). 

Related entries & more 
train (n.)

early 14c., "a drawing out, delay;" late 14c., "trailing part of a skirt, gown, or cloak;" also "retinue, procession," from Old French train "tracks, path, trail (of a robe or gown); act of dragging," from trainer "to pull, drag, draw," from Vulgar Latin *traginare, extended from *tragere "to pull," back-formation from tractus, past participle of Latin trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).,

General sense of "series, progression, succession, continuous course" is from late 15c.; train of thought is attested from 1650s. The railroad sense "locomotive and the cars coupled to it" is recorded from 1820 (publication year, dated 1816), from the notion of a "trailing succession" of wagons or carriages pulled by a mechanical engine.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
toil (v.)

early 14c., toilen, "pull at, tug," from Anglo-French toiller, Old French toellier "pull or drag about" (see toil (n.1)). Intransitive meaning "struggle, work hard, labor for considerable time" is from late 14c., perhaps by influence of till (v.). Related: Toiled; toiling.

Related entries & more 
tuck (v.)

late 14c., "to pull or gather up," earlier "to pluck, stretch" (implied in tucker "one who finishes clothes by stretching them on tenters, late 13c. as a surname), probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch tucken "pull up, draw up, tug" (cognate with Old English tucian "mistreat, torment," and related to Old English togian "to pull," German zucken; see tow (v.)). Sense of "thrust into a snug place" is first recorded 1580s. Slang meaning "to consume, swallow, put into one's stomach" is recorded from 1784. Related: Tucked; tucking.

Related entries & more 
perambulate (v.)

"walk through, about, or over," 1560s, from Latin perambulatus, past participle of perambulare "to walk through, go through, ramble through," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Related: Perambulated; perambulating.

Related entries & more 
delibrate (v.)

1620s, "to pull off the bark of a tree," from Latin delibrare "to peel," from de "off, away" (see de-) + liber "bark" (see library). Related: Delibrated; delibrating.

Related entries & more 
pullover (adj.)

also pull-over, 1871, originally of hats, from the verbal phrase; see pull (v.) + over (adv.). As a noun, from 1875 as a kind of cap of silk or felted fur drawn over a hat-body to form the napping; 1925 as a type of sweater (short for pullover sweater, 1912), so called in reference to the method of putting it on by drawing it over the head. To pull over, in reference to a driver or motor vehicle, "go to the side of the road," is by 1930.

Related entries & more 

Page 3