Etymology
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libidinal (adj.)
in psychology jargon, 1922, in Joan Riviere's translation of Freud, from combining form of libido (Latin genitive libidinis) + -al (1).
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ambivalent (adj.)

"having simultaneous conflicting feelings or contradictory ideas about something," 1916, originally a term in psychology; a back-formation from ambivalence. In general use by 1929.

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inversion (n.)
1550s, "act of inverting;" 1590s, "state of being inverted," from Latin inversionem (nominative inversio) "an inversion," noun of action from past participle stem of invertere "turn about, turn upside-down" (see invert). Meteorological sense is from 1902. In old psychology, "homosexuality" (1895, short for sexual inversion) but in later psychology "identification with the opposite sex" (1958).
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reinforcement (n.)

c. 1600, "act of reinforcing," from reinforce + -ment. Meaning "an augmentation, an additional force, that which reinforces" is from 1650s. In psychology by 1876. Related: Reinforcements.

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mandala (n.)

symbolic magic circle used by Buddhists in meditation, 1792, from Sanskrit mandala "disc, circle." Adopted 20c. in Jungian psychology as a symbol of unity of the self and completeness.

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purposive (adj.)

"accomplishing some end; having an aim or purpose," 1849, from purpose (n.) + -ive. By 1884 in psychology, etc., "relating to conscious or unconscious purpose in behavior." Related: Purposively; purposiveness

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parapraxis (n.)

"faulty action, blunder," 1904, from Modern Latin, from para-, here meaning "contrary" (see para- (1)) + Greek praxis "a doing, transaction, business" (see praxis). In psychology, a minor error held to reveal a subconscious motive.

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ideagenous (adj.)

"generating or giving rise to ideas," 1839; see idea + -genous. A word from early psychology, apparently coined by Dr. Thomas Laycock, house surgeon to York County Hospital [Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, vol. lii]. 

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archetype (n.)

"model, first form, original pattern from which copies are made," 1540s [Barnhart] or c. 1600 [OED], from Latin archetypum, from Greek arkhetypon "pattern, model, figure on a seal," neuter of adjective arkhetypos "first-moulded," from arkhē "beginning, origin, first place" (verbal noun of arkhein "to be the first;" see archon) + typos "model, type, blow, mark of a blow" (see type).

The Jungian psychology sense of "pervasive idea or image from the collective unconscious" is from 1919. Jung defined archetypal images as "forms or images of a collective nature which occur practically all over the earth as constituents of myths and at the same time as autochthonous individual products of unconscious origin." ["Psychology and Religion" 1937]

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interpersonal (adj.)
1911 (OED finds an isolated use from 1842), from inter- "between" + person (n.) + -al. Introduced in psychology (1938) by H.S. Sullivan (1892-1949) to describe behavior between people in an encounter. Related: Interpersonally.
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