Etymology
Advertisement
premier (adj.)

mid-15c., "first in time, earliest in appearance;" late 15c. as "first in rank or importance," from French premier "first, chief," from Latin primarius "of the first rank; chief, principal; excellent," from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Hebe (1)

c. 1600, Greek goddess of youth, daughter of Zeus and Hera, wife of Hercules, from Greek hēbē "youth, youthful prime, strength of youth" (legally, "the time before manhood," in Athens 16, in Sparta 18), from PIE *yeg-wa- "power, youth, strength."

Related entries & more 
Nehru 

in reference to a type of long, narrow jacket with a standing collar (popular in Western fashion late 1960s), 1967, from Jawaharlal Nehru (1889-1964), first prime minister of independent India (1947-1964), who often wore such a jacket in public appearances.

Related entries & more 
thatcher (n.)
early 14c. (late 12c. as a surname); agent noun from thatch (v.). Corresponds to Old English þecere, Dutch dekker, German Decker. Thatcherite in British politics (1976) refers to policies and principles of Conservative politician and prime minister Margaret Thatcher (1925-2013).
Related entries & more 
Melbourne 

city in Australia, named 1837 for William Lamb (1779-1848), 2nd Viscount Melbourne, then British Prime Minister; the title is from Melbourne Hall, Derbyshire. The place name is literally "mill stream," Old English Mileburne (1086).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
prima facie (adv.)

of a case established by sufficient evidence, "manifestly, in a manner apparent to all," late 15c., Latin, literally "at first sight," ablative of prima facies "first appearance," from prima, fem. singular of primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + facies "form, face" (see face (n.)).

Related entries & more 
privet (n.)

type of evergreen shrub, native to the northern Old World and somewhat nativized in North America, "much used for garden hedges" [OED], 1540s, a word of unknown origin. Early forms primet, primprint perhaps suggest some connection real or perceived with prime [Klein]. Also applied to similar species elsewhere.

Related entries & more 
primeval (adj.)

also primaeval, "of or belonging to the first age," 1650s, with -al (1) + Latin primaevus "early in life, youthful," from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + aevum "an age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity"). Related: Primevally.

Related entries & more 
primacy (n.)

late 14c., primacie, "preeminent position, supremacy, condition of being first in order, power, or importance," from Old French primacie (14c.; Modern French primatie) and directly from Medieval Latin primatia "office of a church primate" (12c.), from Late Latin primas (genitive primatis) "principal, chief, of the first rank," from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)).

Related entries & more 
primogenitor (n.)

"an ancestor, a forefather," 1650s, from Medieval Latin primogenitor, from Latin primo (adv.) "first in order of time; at first," from primus "first" (see prime (adj.)) + genitor "father," from genitus, past participle of gignere "to beget" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). Related: Primogenital; primogenitary. The fem. form is primogenitrix (1875). The rights of a second son are secundogeniture.

Related entries & more 

Page 3