Etymology
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beggary (n.)

late 14c., "practice of begging, mendicancy; poverty," from beggar (n.) + -y (2).

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sarcophagy (n.)

"practice of eating meat," 1640s, from sarco- "flesh" +-phagy "eating" (see -phagous).

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dating (n.)

"act or practice of having (romantic) dates," by 1939, verbal noun from date (v.2).

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pilferage (n.)

"act or practice of petty theft; that which is stolen," 1620s, from pilfer + -age.

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midwifery (n.)

"the practice of obstetrics," late 15c., mede-wifri, "the craft or service of a midwife;" a hybrid from midwife + -ery.

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proselytism (n.)

"the act or practice of making converts to a religion, doctrine, creed, sect, etc.," 1650s, from proselyte + -ism.

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experimentation (n.)

"the act or practice of making experiments, the process of experimenting," 1670s, noun of action from experiment (v.).

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addict (n.)

"one given over to some practice," 1909, first in reference to morphine, from addict (v.).

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disuse (n.)

"cessation of use or practice," c. 1400, see dis- + use (n.). Disusage is from mid-15c.

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chirology (n.)

"art or practice of finger-spelling, use of the manual alphabet," 1650s, from chiro- "hand" + -logy "a speaking."

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