Etymology
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penury (n.)

"extreme poverty, indigence, destitution," c. 1400, penurie, from Latin penuria "want, need; scarcity," related to pæne "nearly, almost, practically," which is of uncertain origin.

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eye-catching (adj.)

1799, from eye (n.) + present participle of catch (v.). Eye-catcher (n.) is from 1882, first in advertising; eye-trap (n.) is attested from 1785.

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bait (v.2)

"to put food on a fishing line or in a trap," c. 1400, probably from bait (n.). From 1590s as "to lure by bait." Related: Baited; baiting.

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poorly (adv.)

early 13c., poureliche, "inadequately, badly, insufficiently," from poor (adj.) + -ly (2). Modern form from 15c. Meaning "in poverty" is from mid-14c. Meaning "indisposed, in somewhat ill health" is from 1750.

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decoy (v.)

1650s, "to allure or entice;" 1670s, "to lure (someone or something) into a trap or snare, entrap by allurements," from decoy (n.). Related: Decoyed; decoying.

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traps (n.2)

"drums, cymbals, bells, etc.," 1925, from earlier trap drummer (1903) "street musician who plays a drum and several other instruments at once," perhaps from traps "belongings" (1813), shortened form of trappings.

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tourist (n.)

1772, "one who makes a journey for pleasure, stopping here and there" (originally especially a travel-writer), from tour (n.) + -ist. Tourist trap attested from 1939, in Graham Greene. Related: Touristic.

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mice (n.)

plural of mouse (n.), from Old English mys. It shows effects of i-mutation.

A cube of cheese no larger than a die
May bait the trap to catch a nibbling mie.
[Bierce]
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enlace (v.)

late 14c., "connect, involve, entangle," from Old French enlacer "trap, ensnare, capture," from Late Latin *inlaciare, from in- (from PIE root *en "in") + *lacius, from Latin laqueus "noose" (see lace (n.)). Related: Enlaced; enlacing.

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traps (n.1)

"expanse of dark igneous rock," 1794, from Swedish trapp (Torbern Bergman, 1766), from trappa "stair," related to Middle Low German trappe "staircase" (see trap (n.)). So called from the step-like appearance of the rock.

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