Etymology
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agro- 

word-forming element meaning "pertaining to agriculture or cultivation," from Greek agros "field," from PIE root *agro- "field."

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agriology (n.)
study of prehistoric human customs, 1878, from agrio-, from Greek agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + -logy. Related: Agriologist (n., 1875); agriological.
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battlefield (n.)
also battle-field, "scene of a battle," 1812, from battle (n.) + field (n.). The usual word for it in Old English was wælstow, literally "slaughter-place."
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Akita 
type of dog, named for a prefecture in northern Japan. The place name is said to mean literally "field of ripe rice," from aki "autumn, fall" + ta "field of rice."
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*agro- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "field;" probably a derivative of root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move."

It forms all or part of: acorn; acre; agrarian; agriculture; agriology; agro-; agronomy; onager; peregrinate; peregrination; peregrine; pilgrim; stavesacre.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit ajras "plain, open country," Greek agros "field," Latin ager (genitive agri) "a field," Gothic akrs, Old English æcer "field."
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croft (n.)

"small piece of enclosed ground for agricultural purposes, a very small farm," especially of those on the western coast and isles of Scotland. Old English croft "enclosed field, small field," of unknown etymology. Germanic and Celtic sources have been proposed.

Crofter "tenant who holds a small field, one who occupies a croft," especially "small farmer on the western coast and islands of Scotland," is by 1762 (from late 13c. as a surname), originally Scottish.

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pallet (n.2)

"flat wooden blade" used as a tool by potters, etc., for shaping their wares, early 15c., from Old French palete, diminutive of pale "spade, shovel" (see palette, which is the more French spelling of the same word). The original sense in English was medical, "flat instrument for depressing the tongue." Meaning "large portable tray" used with a forklift for moving loads is from 1921.

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onager (n.)

Asiatic wild ass, mid-14c., from Latin onager, from Greek onagros, from onos "ass, she-ass" (related to Latin asinus, but the ultimate source is unknown; see ass (n.1)) + agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field").

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misfield (v.)
1870, from mis- (1) + field (v.) in the sporting sense. Related: Misfielded; misfielding.
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