Etymology
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component (n.)

1640s, "constituent part or element" (earlier "one of a group of persons," 1560s), from Latin componentem (nominative componens), present participle of componere "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (see position (n.)). Related: Componential.

Meaning "mechanical part of a bicycle, automobile, etc." is from 1896. As an adjective, "constituent, entering into the composition of," from 1660s.

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repose (v.2)

"to put, place," mid-15c., reposen, "to put (something) back;" perhaps from re- "back, again" + pose (v.) or so formed in Middle English from Old French poser, on model of disposen "dispose" [Klein], or else from Latin repos-, infinitive stem of reponere "put back, set back, replace, restore; put away, lay out, stretch out," from re- + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Related: Reposed; reposing.

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apposition (n.)
Origin and meaning of apposition

"application" (of one thing to another), mid-15c., originally in grammatical sense "the relation to a noun or pronoun of another noun or clause added to it by way of explanation," from Latin appositionem (nominative appositio) "a setting before," noun of action from past-participle stem of apponere "lay beside, set near," especially "serve, set before," also "put upon, apply," from ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). The general sense is from 1540s.

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decomposite (adj.)

1650s, "compounded a second time, compounded from things already composite," from Late Latin compositus, in grammar (rendering Greek parasynthetos), "formed from a compound," literally "placed together," past participle of componere  "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Earlier in English as a noun, "something compounded of composite things" (1620s). Middle English had decompound (adj.) in grammar (mid-15c.).

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compote (n.)

1690s, "fruit preserved in syrup," from French compote "stewed fruit, fruit preserved in syrup," from Old French composte (13c.) "mixture, compost," from Vulgar Latin *composita, fem. of compositus "placed together," past participle of componere  "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Etymologically the same word as compost (n.).

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suppose (v.)

early 14c., "to assume as the basis of argument," from Old French suposer "to assume" (13c.), probably a replacement (influenced by Old French poser "put, place") of *suppondre, from Latin supponere "put or place under; to subordinate, make subject," from assimilated form of sub "under" (see sub-) + ponere "put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Meaning "to admit as possible, to believe to be true" is from 1520s.

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compound (v.)

late 14c., compounen, "to put together, to mix, to combine; to join, couple together," from Old French compondre, componre "arrange, direct," and directly from Latin componere "to put together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (see position (n.)). The unetymological -d appeared 1500s in English by the same process  that yielded expound, propound, etc. Intransitive sense is from 1727. Related: Compounded; compounding.

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transpose (v.)

late 14c., from Old French transposer "transfer, remove; present, render symbolically" (14c.), from Latin transponere (past participle transpositus) "to place over, set over," from trans "across, beyond; over" (see trans-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Form altered in French on model of poser "to put, place." Sense of "put music in a different key" is from c. 1600. Related: Transposed; transposing.

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expose (v.)

early 15c., "to leave without shelter or defense," from Old French esposer, exposer "lay open, set forth, speak one's mind, explain" (13c.), from Latin exponere "set forth, lay open, exhibit, reveal, publish," from ex "from, forth" (see ex-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Altered in French by confusion with poser "to place, lay down" (see pose (v.1)). Meaning "to exhibit openly" is from 1620s; that of "to unmask" is from 1690s. Photographic sense is from 1839. Related: Exposed; exposes; exposing.

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imposition (n.)

late 14c., "a tax, duty, tribute," from Old French imposicion "tax, duty; a fixing" (early 14c.), from Latin impositionem (nominative impositio) "a laying on," noun of action from past participle stem of imponere "to place upon," from assimilated form of in "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Sense of "the act of putting (something) on (something else)" is from 1590s. Meaning "an act or instance of imposing" (on someone) first recorded 1630s, a noun of action from impose, which is unrelated to the earlier word.

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