Etymology
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Bratislava 
capital of Slovakia, a Slavic settlement named for its founder or chief; the name is the same element in the first half of the German name for the city, Pressburg (9c.).
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Hoover 
proprietary name for a make of vacuum cleaner (patented 1927); sometimes used generally for "vacuum cleaner." As a verb, meaning "to vacuum," from 1926, in the company's advertising.
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Manuel 
masc. proper name, short for Emmanuel.
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Toyota 
Japanese automaker, begun 1930s as a division of Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, named for the family name of the founder. There seems to be no one accepted explanation for the change from -d- to -t-.
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Bering 

strait and sea between Alaska and Siberia, named for Danish explorer Vitus Bering, who worked for Peter the Great and led the first European expedition to sight Alaska, in 1741.

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Hildegard 
Germanic fem. proper name, Old High German Hildegard, literally "protecting battle-maid;" for first element see Hilda; for second element see yard (n.1).
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Coke 

soft drink, 1909, a popular shortening of the brand name Coca-Cola, perhaps influenced by the earlier slang use of coke for cocaine (another popular early name for the soft drink was dope).

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Rohypnol (n.)
1995, trade name for a powerful insomnia drug.
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Parkinson's Law 
1955 (in the "Economist" of Nov. 19), named for its deviser, British historian and journalist Cyril Northcote Parkinson (1909-1993): "work expands to fill the time available for its completion."
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Adonai 
Old Testament word for "God," used as a substitute for the ineffable name, late 14c., from Medieval Latin, from Hebrew, literally "my lord," from adon (see Adonis) + suffix of the first person.
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