Etymology
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typo (n.)
1816, "compositor," short for typographer; 1892 as short for typographical error.
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recon 

military slang shortening; 1918 for reconnaissance (n.); 1966 for reconnoiter (v.).

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woodshed (n.)
"shed for keeping wood as fuel," 1799, from wood (n.) + shed (n.). Sometimes a euphemism for "outhouse." Figuratively, as the place for private punishment, by 1907, American English colloquial.
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latch (n.)
"device for catching and retaining," especially "a fastening for a door," late 13c., probably from latch (v.).
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pro bono 

short for Medieval Latin pro bono publico "for the public good;" from pro (prep.) "on behalf of, for" (see pro-) + ablative of bonum "good" (see bene-).

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treasury (n.)
c. 1300, "room for treasure," from Old French tresorie "treasury" (11c.), from tresor (see treasure (n.)). Meaning "department of state that controls public revenue" is recorded from late 14c. An Old English word for "room for treasure" was maðm-hus and for "treasury," feo-hus (see fee).
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MIDI 

"device for connecting computers and electronic musical instruments," 1983, acronym for Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

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Ulysses 
Latin name for Odysseus, from Latin Ulysses, Ulixes. Famous for wandering as well as craftiness and ability at deceit. For -d- to -l- alteration, see lachrymose.
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mono 

1959 as a shortening of monophonic in reference to recordings; earlier used among printers for "monotype machine" (c. 1925) and generally for monochrome (motorcar, etc.), 1940s. From 1964 as short for mononucleosis.

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twofer (n.)
1911 (originally in reference to cigars), from two for (a quarter); see two + for.
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