Etymology
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playful (adj.)

"lighthearted, full of play, frolicsome, frisky," early 13c., pleiful, from play (n.) + -ful. Related: Playfully; playfulness.

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swordplay (n.)
also sword-play, Old English sweordplege; see sword + play (n.).
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outplay (v.)

also out-play, "to play better than, surpass in playing," 1640s, from out- + play (v.). Related: Outplayed; outplaying.

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playbook (n.)

also play-book, 1530s, "book of stage plays," from play (n.) + book (n.). From 1690s as "book containing material for amusement," especially "a picture book for children." Meaning "book of football plays" recorded from 1965.

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playable (adj.)

late 15c., plaiabil, "playful, sportive," from play (v.) + -able. Original sense is obsolete; the meaning "capable of being played" in various senses is from 1860. Related: Playability.

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playboy (n.)

1829, "wealthy bon vivant," from play (v.) + boy. As the name of a U.S.-based magazine for men, from December 1953. Earlier (1620s), play-boy meant "schoolboy actor." Fem. equivalent playgirl is recorded by 1934.

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playground (n.)

"piece of ground set aside for open-air recreation," especially as connected with a school, 1780; see play (v.) + ground (n.). Old English had plegstow, plaeg-stede, "village sports ground, gymnasium," literally "place for play."

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downplay (v.)

"de-emphasize, minimize," 1968, from verbal phrase play (something) down, which is perhaps from music or theater;  down (adv.) + play (v.). Related: Downplayed; downplaying.

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misplay (n.)

"a wrong play," 1889 in baseball context, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + play (n.). As a verb from 1824 (originally in music; 1842 in games). Related: Misplayed; misplaying.

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playmate (n.)

1640s, "companion in play or amusement, playfellow," from play (v.) + mate (n.). The sexual sense is from 1954 and the launch of "Playboy" magazine. The earlier word was Middle English playfere (also playfeer, playpheer) with obsolete fere "companion."

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