Etymology
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tress (n.)
c. 1300, "long lock of hair," from Old French tresse "a plait or braid of hair" (12c.), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *trichia "braid, rope," from Greek trikhia "rope," from thrix (genitive trikhos) "hair." Related: Tresses.
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duplicate (adj.)

early 15c., "having two parts, double," from Latin duplicatus, past participle of duplicare "to double," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Meaning "exactly corresponding, that is an exact copy of" is from 1812.

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duplicate (v.)

late 15c., "to repeat, produce a second (like the first);" 1620s, "to double," from Latin duplicatus, past participle of duplicare "to double," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Related: Duplicated; duplicating.

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plie (n.)

in ballet, 1892, from French plié, literally "bent," from plier "to bend," from Old French ploier "fold, pleat, layer" (12c.), verbal noun from ployer (later pleier) "to bend, to fold," from Latin plicare "to fold, lay" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Compare ply (v.2).

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braid (v.)

"to plait, knit, weave, twist together," c. 1200, breidan, from Old English bregdan "to move quickly, pull, shake, swing, throw (in wrestling), draw (a sword); bend, weave, knit, join together; change color, vary; scheme, feign, pretend" (class III strong verb, past tense brægd, past participle brogden), from Proto-Germanic *bregdanan "make sudden jerky movements from side to side" (compare Old Norse bregða "to brandish, turn about, move quickly; braid;" Old Saxon bregdan "to weave, braid;" Old Frisian brida "to twitch (the eye);" Dutch breien "to knit;" Old High German brettan "to draw, weave, braid"), perhaps from a PIE root *bhrek- (compare Sanskrit bhurati "moves quickly," Lithuanian bruzdùs "fast"), but there are phonetic difficulties. In English the verb survives only in the narrow definition of "plait hair." Related: Braided; braiding.

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simplex (adj.)
"characterized by a single part," 1590s, from Latin simplex "single, simple, plain, unmixed, uncompounded," literally "onefold," from PIE compound of root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with" + *plac- "-fold," from PIE root *plek- "to plait." The noun is attested from 1892, "simple uncompounded word."
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duplex (adj.)

1817, "composed of two parts, double, twofold," from Latin duplex "twofold," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two") + -plex, from PIE root *plek- "to plait." The noun in the sense of "house or other building so divided that it forms two dwelling places" (also sometimes "two-story apartment") is American English, by 1922.

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implication (n.)
early 15c., "action of entangling," from Latin implicationem (nominative implicatio) "an interweaving, an entanglement," noun of state from past participle stem of implicare "involve, entangle; embrace; connect closely, associate," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). Meaning "that which is implied (but not expressed), inference drawn from what is observed" is from 1550s.
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pliable (adj.)

late 14c., "easy to be bent, readily yielding to force or pressure without rupture," from Old French ploiable "flexible, bendable," from plier "to bend," from Latin plicare "to fold, lay" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"). The figurative sense of "flexible in disposition, readily yielding to influence or argument" is by late 15c. Related: Pliably, pliability.

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plexus (n.)

1680s, in anatomy, "an interlacing of nerves, vessels, or fibers," Modern Latin, literally "braid, network," noun use of past participle of Latin plectere "to twine, braid, fold," from suffixed form of PIE root *plek- "to plait." Original use in solar plexus "network of nerves in the abdomen" (see solar). General sense of "net-like arrangement of parts" is from 1760s. Related: Plexal.

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