Etymology
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piece de resistance (n.)

"most important piece or feature," 1831, from French pièce de résistance, originally "the most substantial dish in a meal." Literally "piece of resistance;" there seems to be disagreement as to the exact signification.

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coda (n.)

"passage added to a musical composition for the purpose of bringing it to a conclusion," 1753, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of uncertain origin. De Vaan traces it to Proto-Italic *kaud-a- "part; tail," from PIE *kehu-d- "cleaved, separate," from root *khu-. He writes: "Since words for 'piece, part' are often derived from 'to cut, cleave', the tail may have been referred to as the loose 'part' of the animal."

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bobtail (n.)
also bob-tail, c. 1600, "tail of a horse cut short," from bob (n.2) + tail (n.). Related: Bobtailed.
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oxtail (n.)

"the tail of an ox, prepared as food," Old English oxan tægl; see ox + tail (n.1).

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fantail (n.)
1728, "a tail shaped like a fan," from fan (n.1) + tail (n.1). Specifically of birds from 1848.
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caudal (adj.)

"pertaining to or situated near a tail," 1660s, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin, + -al (1).

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cattail (n.)

also cat-tail, cat's tail, type of tall, reed-like aquatic plant, mid-15c., from cat (n.) + tail (n.). So called for its long, cylindrical, furry spikes.

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ring-tailed (adj.)

"having the tail ringed with alternating colors," 1725 in ornithology, by 1729 in zoology, from ring (n.1) + tail (n.).

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Deneb 

bright star in the tail of the constellation Cygnus the Swan, by 1741, from Arabic Al Dhanab al Dajajah "the Hen's Tail."

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caudate (adj.)

"having a tail," c. 1600, from Modern Latin caudatus, from Latin cauda "tail of an animal," which is of unknown origin. Related: Caudation.

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