Etymology
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de facto 

Latin, literally "in fact, in reality," thus, "existing, but not necessarily legally ordained or morally right;" from facto, ablative of factum "deed, act" (see de +  fact).

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de novo 

Latin, "anew, afresh," hence "from the beginning," from ablative of novus "new" (see new).

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de-escalate (v.)

also deescalate, "reduce the intensity of," 1964, from de- "do the opposite of" + escalate. Related: De-escalated; de-escalating; de-escalation.

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De Profundis 

"the 130th Psalm" (one of the seven penitential psalms), so called for its opening words in Latin, literally "out of the depths (have I cried)." From ablative plural of profundum (see profound).

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coup de foudre (n.)

"sudden, unforeseen occurrence," 1779, from French coup de foudre, literally "stroke of lightning," also "love at first sight" (see coup).

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felo-de-se (n.)
in old law use, "one who commits the felony of suicide," whether deliberately or in maliciously attempting to kill another, Latin, literally "one guilty concerning himself." See felon.
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hors de combat (adv.)
1757, French, literally "out of combat." Hors (prep.) "out, beyond," is from Latin foris (adv.) "outside," literally "out of doors" (see foreign). De is from Latin de "of." For combat see combat (n.). A similar expression from French is hors concours "out of competition" (1884), of a work of art in an exhibition.
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van de Graaff 
in reference to an electrostatic charge generator, 1934, named for U.S. physicist R.J. van de Graaff (1901-1967).
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tour de force (n.)
"feat of strength," 1802, French; see tour (n.) + force (n.).
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hi-de-hi 

call-and-response exclamation in singing, by 1933, associated with U.S. bandleader Cabell "Cab" Calloway (1907-1994) and especially his signature song "Minnie the Moocher," which dates from 1931.

Calloway recalled in his autobiography that the song came first and the chorus was later improvised when he forgot the lyrics during a radio broadcast. ["Harlem Renaissance Lives," Oxford, 2009]
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