Etymology
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physique (n.)

"physical structure or organization," especially of a human body, 1826, from French physique, noun use of physique (adj.) "physical," from Latin physicus "natural, physics," from Greek physikos, from physis "nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow").

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yoni (n.)
1799, from Sanskrit, "female sexual principle as an object of veneration," literally "vulva, womb."
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idol (n.)

mid-13c., "image of a deity as an object of (pagan) worship," from Old French idole "idol, graven image, pagan god" (11c.), from Latin idolum "image (mental or physical), form," especially "apparition, ghost," but used in Church Latin for "false god, image of a pagan deity as an object of worship." This is from Greek eidolon "mental image, apparition, phantom," also "material image, statue," in Ecclesiastical Greek," a pagan idol," from eidos "form, shape; likeness, resemblance" (see -oid).

A Greek word for "image," used in Jewish and early Christian writers for "image of a false god," hence also "false god." The Germanic languages tended to form a word for it from the reverse direction, from "god" to "false god," hence "image of a false god" (compare Old English afgod, Danish afgud, Swedish avgud, Old High German abgot, compounds with af-/ab- "away, away from" (source of off) + god).

The older Greek senses sometimes have been used in English. Figurative sense of "something idolized" is first recorded 1560s (in Middle English the figurative sense was "someone who is false or untrustworthy"). Meaning "a person so adored, human object of adoring devotion" is from 1590s.

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objectivity (n.)
1803, from Medieval Latin objectivus, from Latin objectus (see object (n.)) + -ity.
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lady-love (n.)
"woman who is the object of one's affections," 1733; see lady + love (n.).
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faculties (n.)
"powers or properties of one's mind," also "physical functions," early 16c., plural of faculty.
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fish-tank (n.)
1921 as an ornamental object, from fish (n.) + tank (n.).
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landmark (n.)

Old English landmearc "object set up to mark the boundaries of a kingdom, estate, etc.," from land (n.) + mearc in its sense "object which marks a boundary or limit" (see mark (n.1)). General sense of "conspicuous object which, by its known position, serves as a guide to a traveler," originally especially an object that can be seen from sea, is from 1560s. Modern figurative sense of "event, etc., considered a high point in history" is from 1859.

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facilities (n.)
"opportunities," 1809, plural of facility. Sense of "physical means of doing something" is from 1872.
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qi (n.)

in Chinese philosophy, "physical life force," 1850, said to be from Chinese qi "air, breath."

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