Etymology
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optometry (n.)

"measurement of the range of vision; measurement of the visual powers in general," 1886, from optometer (1738), name given to an instrument for testing vision, from opto- "sight," from Greek optos "seen, visible" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + -metry "a measuring of." Probably influenced by French optométrie.

When I made the foregoing Experiments, I designed to repeat them with more Care and Exactness, and to make some new ones of the same Sort, by means of an Instrument I had contrived for that Purpose; which from its Use in measuring the Limits of distinct Vision, and in determining with great Exactness the Strength and Weakness of Sight, may be called an Optometer. [Dr. William Porterfield, "An Essay Concerning the Motions of our Eyes, Part II," in Medical Essays and Observations, Vol. IV, Edinburgh, 1738]
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hyperopia (n.)

"very acute vision," 1861, Modern Latin, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek ōps "eye" (from PIE root *okw- "to see"), with abstract noun ending. Related: Hyperopic.

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clearly (adv.)

c. 1300, of vision and speech, "in a clear manner, without obscurity," from clear (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "evidently" is from 1560s; as a parenthetical expression in argument, "it is clear," recorded from 1867.

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optic (adj.)

late 14c., optik, "of or pertaining to the eye as the organ of vision," from Old French optique, obtique (c. 1300) and directly from Medieval Latin opticus "of sight or seeing," from Greek optikos "of or having to do with sight," from optos "seen, visible," related to ōps "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." Meaning "relating to or pertaining to vision or sight" is from 1590s. Optics "eyes" is from 1640s; "formerly the learned and elegant term; afterwards pedantic, and now usually humorous" [OED].

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blear (adj.)
c. 1300, of the eyes, blere "watery, rheumy, sore or dimmed with watery discharge," from or related to blear (v.). Compare Middle High German blerre "having blurred vision," Low German bleeroged "blear-eyed."
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blear (v.)
"to dim (the vision) with tears, rheum, etc.," also "to have watery or rheumy eyes," early 14c., of uncertain origin, possibly from an unrecorded Old English *blerian, which is perhaps related to blur. Related: Bleared; blearing.
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chromatopsy (n.)

 also chromatopsia, "color-vision, abnormal condition in which things are seen unnaturally colored or sensations of color are independent of natural cause," 1849, from chromato- + -opsy, from Greek opsis "a sight" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") 

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stereoscope (n.)

1838, coined by inventor Professor Charles Wheatstone (1802-1875) from stereo- + -scope. Instrument allowing binocular vision of two identical pictures that appear as a single image with relief and solidity. Related: Stereoscopy; stereoscopically.

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visible (adj.)
mid-14c., from Old French visable, visible "perceptible" (12c.) and directly from Latin visibilis "that may be seen," from visus, past participle of videre "to see" (see vision). An Old English word for this was eagsyne. Related: Visibly.
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au revoir (interj.)
1690s, French, "good-bye for now," literally "to the seeing again." From au "to the" (see au) + revoir "see again, see in turn" (Old French reveoir, 12c.), from Latin revidere, from re- "back, again" (see re-) + videre "to see" (see vision).
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