Etymology
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petroleur (n.)

"an incendiary," especially one of the adherents of the Commune who used petroleum to set fire to the public buildings of Paris upon the entry of the national troops, 1871, from French pétroleur, from petrole (see petrol). The fem. form is pétroleuse.

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Eiffel Tower 
erected in the Champ-de-Mars for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1889; at 984.25 feet the world's tallest structure at the time. Designed by French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (1832-1923).
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Chantilly 
town in France near Paris; as a kind of porcelain made there, 1774; in reference to a delicate lace originally made there, 1831. The place name is Medieval Latin Chantileium, from the Gallo-Roman personal name Cantilius.
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grand prix 
1863, French, literally "great prize," originally in English in reference to the Grand Prix de Paris, international horse race for three-year-olds, run every June at Longchamps beginning in 1863.
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francium (n.)
radioactive element, 1946, named by French physicist Marguerite Catherine Perey (1909-1975) who first identified it at the Curie Institute in Paris, from Latinized form of France. With metallic element ending -ium.
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flea market (n.)
1910, especially in reference to the marché aux puces in Paris, so-called "because there are so many second-hand articles sold of all kinds that they are believed to gather fleas." [E.S. Dougherty, "In Europe," 1922].
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Chablis (n.)
light, white Burgundy wine, 1660s, named for town of Chablis southeast of Paris. Made only of Chardonnay grapes. The French word chablis (16c.) is literally "deadwood," fallen from a tree through age or brought down by wind, short for bois chablis, from Old French *chableiz.
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ganache (n.)

"soft, sweet paste made of melted chocolate and cream," 1962, from Italian, the thing itself is said by Ayto ["Diner's Dictionary"] to have been created in Paris c. 1850; the name is of unknown origin. It is attested 19c. as the name of a kind of garment and an insult ("blockhead").

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pari-mutuel 

1881 in reference to a form of betting, from French pari-mutuel "mutual wager," from pari "wager" (from parier "to bet," from Latin pariare "to settle a debt," literally "to make equal," from par, genitive paris, "equal;" see par (n.)) + mutuel "mutual," from Latin mutuus (see mutual (adj.)).

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art deco (n.)

decorative and architectural style popular from 1925-1940, the name attested from 1966, from shortening of French art décoratif, literally "decorative art" (see decorative); the French phrase is from the title of L'Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, held in Paris in 1925.

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