Etymology
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pasty (adj.)

"resembling paste" in consistence or color, 1650s, from paste (n.) + -y (2). Related: Pastiness.

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paste-up (n.)

1930, in printing, "a plan of a page with the position of text, illustrations, etc. indicated," from verbal phrase; see paste (v.) + up (adv.).

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cut-and-paste (adj.)

"made or composed by piecing together existing parts," by 1938 with reference to trick photographs; see cut (v.) + paste (v.). By 1959 with reference to doing things with haste, carelessness, or lack of inspiration.

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pastry (n.)

mid-15c., "food made with or from paste or having it as a principal ingredient," not originally limited to sweets, from Middle English paste (see paste (n.)) + -ry. Probably influenced by Old French pastoierie "pastry" (Modern French pâtisserie), from pastoier "pastry cook," from paste (see paste (n.)); also borrowed from Medieval Latin pasteria "pastry," from Latin pasta. Specific sense of "small confection made of pastry" is by 1906. Pastry-cook is attested from 1650s.

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pasta (n.)

a generic name for Italian dough-based foods such as spaghetti, macaroni, etc., 1874, but not common in English until after World War II, from Italian pasta, from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste," from Greek pasta "barley porridge," probably originally "a salted mess of food," from neuter plural of pastos (adj.) "sprinkled, salted," from passein "to sprinkle," from PIE root *kwet- "to shake" (see quash).

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pastrami (n.)

highly seasoned smoked beef, 1916, from Yiddish pastrame, from Rumanian pastrama, probably from Turkish pastrima, variant of basdirma "dried meat," from root *bas- "to press." Another possible origin of the Rumanian word [Barnhart] is Modern Greek pastono "I salt," from classical Greek pastos "sprinkled with salt, salted." The spelling in English with -mi probably from influence of salami.

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paste (v.1)

1560s, "to stick with paste or cement;" see paste (n.). Meaning "apply paste to, cover by pasting over" is from c. 1600. Middle English had pasten "to make a paste of; bake in a pastry." Related: Pasted; pasting.

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pasture (v.)

late 14c., pasturen, of animals, "to graze;" c. 1400, "to lead (an animal) to pasture, to feed by putting in a pasture," from Old French pasturer (12c., Modern French pâturer, from pasture (see pasture (n.)). Related: Pastured; pasturing.

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told 
past tense and past participle of tell (v.), from Old English tealde, past tense of tellan.
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bled 
past tense and past participle of bleed (v.).
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