Etymology
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phoneme (n.)

"distinctive sound or group of sounds," 1889, from French phonème, from Greek phōnēma "a sound made, voice," from phōnein "to sound or speak," from phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Related: Phonematic.

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non-resistance (n.)

also nonresistance, "absence of resistance; passive obedience; submission to authority, even if unjustly exercised," 1640s, from non- + resistance. Related: Non-resistant; non-resisting.

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hum (n.)
mid-15c., "a murmuring sound made with the voice," from hum (v.).
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catechumen (n.)

"new convert (to Christianity)," late 14c., cathecumine, catekumeling, from Church Latin catechumenus, from Greek katekhoumenos "one being instructed," passive present participle of katekhein "to teach orally" (see catechesis).

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Saul 
masc. proper name, Biblical first king of Israel, from Latin Saul, from Hebrew Shaul, literally "asked for," passive participle of sha'al "he asked for."
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in fieri 
legal Latin, "in the process of being done," from fieri "to come into being, become," used as passive of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").
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impassive (adj.)
1660s, "not feeling pain, insen" from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + passive. Meaning "void of emotions, unmoved" is from 1690s. Related: Impassively; impassiveness (1640s).
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acquiescence (n.)

1630s, "rest, quiet, satisfaction," from French acquiescence, noun of action from acquiescer "to yield or agree to; be at rest" (see acquiesce). Meaning "silent consent, passive assent" is recorded from 1640s.

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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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stentorian (adj.)
"of powerful voice," c. 1600, from Stentor, legendary Greek herald in the Trojan War, whose voice (described in the "Iliad") was as loud as 50 men. His name is from Greek stenein "groan, moan," from PIE imitative root *(s)ten-, source of Old English þunor "thunder."
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