Etymology
Advertisement
dispassionate (adj.)

1590s, of persons, "free from passions, calm, disposed;" 1640s, "not dictated by passion, impartial;" from dis- "the opposite of" + passionate. Related: Dispassionately.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ire (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French ire "anger, wrath, violence" (11c.), from Latin ira "anger, wrath, rage, passion," from PIE root *eis- (1), forming various words denoting passion (source also of Greek hieros "filled with the divine, holy," oistros "gadfly," originally "thing causing madness;" Sanskrit esati "drives on," yasati "boils;" Avestan aesma "anger;" Lithuanian aistra "violent passion").

Old English irre in a similar sense is unrelated; it is from an adjective irre "wandering, straying, angry," which is cognate with Old Saxon irri "angry," Old High German irri "wandering, deranged," also "angry;" Gothic airzeis "astray," and Latin errare "wander, go astray, angry" (see err (v.)).

Related entries & more 
ardor (n.)

"heat of passion or desire," mid-15c., from Old French ardure "heat, glow; inflammation; passion" (12c., Modern French ardeur), from Latin ardorem (nominative ardor) "a flame, fire, burning, heat;" also of feelings, etc., "eagerness, zeal," from ardere "to burn," from PIE root *as- "to burn, glow." In Middle English used of base passions; since Milton's time of noble ones.

Related entries & more 
Eumenides 
Greek, literally "the well-minded ones," a euphemism of the Erinys; see eu- "well, good;" second element from Greek menos "spirit, passion," from PIE *men-es-, suffixed form of root *men- (1) "to think."
Related entries & more 
madness (n.)

late 14c., "insanity, lunacy, dementia; rash or irrational conduct, headstrong passion, extreme folly," from mad (adj.) + -ness. Sense of "foolishness" is from early 15c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
zounds (interj.)
c. 1600, oath of surprise or anger, altered from (by) God's wounds!, in reference to the wounds of Christ on the Cross. "One of the innumerable oaths having reference to Christ's passion" [Century Dictionary]. Compare gadzooks.
Related entries & more 
rut (v.)

especially of animals, "desire copulation, be under the influence of sexual passion," late 14c., ruteien, from rutei, probably an Anglo-French form of the noun (see rut (n.2)). Related: Rutted; rutting.

Related entries & more 
passivity (n.)

"passiveness," 1650s, from passive + -ity. Middle English had passion in a sense of "fact or condition of being acted upon" (c. 1400), also passabilite "capacity for being acted upon or suffering" (mid-14c.; see passible).

Related entries & more 
dander (n.2)

"temper, anger, passion," 1831, American English, of unknown origin; perhaps a figurative use somehow of dander (n.1), or of West Indian dander, dunder "fermentation of sugar" (in English from 1796), from Spanish redundar "to overflow," from Latin redundare (see redundant).

Related entries & more 
coolly (adv.)

1570s, "without haste or passion," from cool (adj.) + -ly (2). From 1610s as "without heat;" 1620s as "in an indifferent manner;" 1844 as "with quiet presumption or impudence."

Related entries & more 

Page 3