Etymology
Advertisement
secretly (adv.)

early 15c., secretli, "in secret, confidentially, in private, without the knowledge or observation of others," from secret (adj.) + -ly (2). Earlier was secrely (late 14c.), from secre (adj.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
obscure (v.)

early 15c., obscuren, "to cover (something), cloud over," from obscure (adj.) or else from Old French obscurer, from Latin obscurare "to make dark, darken, obscure," from obscurus. Meaning "to conceal from knowledge or observation, disguise" is from 1520s; that of "to overshadow or outshine" is from 1540s. Related: Obscured; obscuring.

Related entries & more 
stall (v.2)
1590s, "distract a victim and thus screen a pickpocket from observation," from stall (n.2) "decoy." Meaning "to prevaricate, be evasive, play for time" is attested from 1903. Related: Stalled; stalling. Compare old slang stalling ken "house for receiving stolen goods" (1560s).
Related entries & more 
fishbowl (n.)

also fish-bowl, "a glass globe in which fish are kept," 1850, from fish (n.) + bowl (n.). The form goldfish-bowl is attested from 1841. Figuratively, as a place where one is under constant observation, by 1957. Fish-globe is by 1858.

Related entries & more 
scopophilia (n.)

"voyeurism, sexual urge or satisfaction chiefly from looking and seeing," 1924 (in a translation of Freud), from a word-forming element made from a Latinized form of Greek -skopia "observation" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe") + -philia. In early use often scoptophilia through a mistake by Freud's translators. The corrected form is by 1937. Related: Scopophiliac; scopophile.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
speculum (n.)
1590s, in surgery and medicine, "instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation," from Latin speculum "reflector, looking-glass, mirror" (also "a copy, an imitation"), from specere "to look at, view" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). As a type of telescope attachment from 1704.
Related entries & more 
notability (n.)

mid-14c., notabilite, "a noteworthy observation or circumstance," from Old French notabilite and directly from Medieval Latin *notabilitatem (nominative *notabilitas), from Latin notabilis "noteworthy" (see notable). From early 15c. as "excellence, pre-eminence." In late 18c.-early 19c. also "housewifely industry."

Related entries & more 
advisement (n.)

early 14c., avisement, "examination, inspection, observation," from Old French avisement "consideration, reflection; counsel, advice," from aviser "deliberate, reflect, consider," from avis "opinion" (see advice). Meaning "advice, counsel" is from c. 1400, as is that of "consultation, conference," now obsolete except in legalese phrase under advisement. The unetymological -d- is a 16c. scribal overcorrection.

Related entries & more 
augury (n.)

late 14c., "divination from the flight of birds," from Old French augure, augurie "divination, soothsaying, sorcery, enchantment," or directly from Latin augurium "divination, the observation and interpretation of omens" (see augur (n.)). Sense of "omen, portent, indication, that which forebodes" is from 1610s. Often in plural, auguries.

Related entries & more 
publicity (n.)

1791, "state or condition of being public or open to the observation and inquiry of a community," from French publicité (1690s), from Medieval Latin publicitatem (nominative publicitas), from Latin publicus (see public (adj.)). Sense of "a making (something) known, an exposure to the public" is from 1826, shading by c. 1900 into "advertising, the business of promotion." Publicity stunt is recorded by 1908.

Related entries & more 

Page 3