Etymology
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partake (v.)

1560s, "to take or have a part, portion, or share in common with others," back-formation from Middle English part-taking "a sharing" (late 14c.), or part-taker "a sharer" (c. 1400), both translations of Latin particeps "participant" (n.), also "sharing, partaking" (see participation). Meaning "to share in some degree the nature, character, or peculiarities of" is from 1610s. Related: Partook; partaking.

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particular (n.)

late 14c., particuler, "a part or section of a whole, an individual circumstance, feature, or factor; an organ or part of the body," from particular (adj.). Meaning "a single instance or matter" is from 1530s; particulars "small details of statement" is from c. 1600.

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partisan (n.)

also partizan, 1550s, "one who takes part with another, zealous supporter," especially one whose judgment is clouded by prejudiced adherence to a party, from French partisan (15c.), from dialectal upper Italian partezan (Tuscan partigiano) "member of a faction, partner," from parte "part, party," from Latin partem (nominative pars) "a part, piece, a share, a division; a party or faction; a part of the body; a fraction; a function, office" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

In military use, "member of a detachment of troops sent on a special mission," from 1690s. As these commonly were irregular troops, it took on the sense of "guerrilla fighter" in the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic wars and again in reference to resistance to Nazi occupation in the Balkans and Eastern Europe in World War II.

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particulate (adj.)

"having the form of a small particle, taking the form of particles," 1871, from Modern Latin particulatus, from particula "little bit or part, grain, jot," diminutive of pars (genitive partis) "a part, piece, division" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). As a noun, "a particulate substance," from 1960. Related: Particulates.

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partition (n.)

c. 1400, particioun, "division into shares, distinction," from Old French particion (12c.), from Latin partitionem (nominative partitio) "a sharing, division, partition, distribution; method of dividing," from past participle stem of partire "to part, divide," from pars "a part, piece, a share" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). Sense of "that which separates" is recorded from late 15c. Meaning "act of parting or dividing, state of being divided" is from c. 1500.

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parti-colored (adj.)

1530s, party-colored, "colored differently in different parts," from party "divided," from Middle English partie "of different colors; different" (late 14c.), from French parti, past participle of partir "to divide," from Latin partiri "to share, part, distribute, divide," from pars "a part, piece, a share" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). The noun parti itself occurs in the sense "parti-colored" from late 14c. Also parti-coloured.

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ex parte 

Latin legal term, "on the one side only," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + parte, ablative of pars "a part, piece, a division, a fraction, a side of the body" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

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participant (adj.)

"sharing, having a share or part," late 15c., from Old French participant and directly from Latin participantem (nominative participans), present participle of participare "to share in, partake of," from particeps "sharing, partaking" (see participation).

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partitive (adj.)

late 14c., partitif, in grammar, "having the quality of dividing into parts," from Late Latin partitivus, from Latin partitus, past participle of partire "to divide," from pars "a part, piece, a share" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

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parterre (n.)

1630s, "a system of beds of different shapes and sizes in which flowers are cultivated," from French parterre (1540s), from adverbial phrase par terre "over the ground;" see par + terrain. Meaning "the part of the floor of a theater beneath the galleries" is by 1711.

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