Etymology
Advertisement
flypaper (n.)
also fly-paper, 1851 (the thing itself is said to have become commonly available in London in 1848), from fly (n.1) + paper (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cartridge (n.)

1570s, cartage, "case of cardboard, tin, etc., holding a charge of gunpowder" (also with the bullet or shot in firearms), corruption of French cartouche "a full charge for a pistol," originally wrapped in paper (16c.), from Italian cartoccio "roll of paper," an augmentative form of Medieval Latin carta "paper" (see card (n.1)). The notion is of a roll of paper containing a charge for a firearm. The modern form of the English word is recorded from 1620s. Extended broadly 20c. to other small containers and their contents. Cartridge-belt is by 1832.

Related entries & more 
quarto (n.)

"book from paper folded twice to make four pages to the sheet, size of book in which the leaf is one-fourth of a certain size of paper," late 15c., in the phrase in quarto, from Medieval Latin in quarto "in the fourth (part of a sheet of paper)," from quarto, ablative singular of Latin quartus "the fourth, fourth part" (related to quattuor "four," from PIE root *kwetwer- "four").

Related entries & more 
cardboard (n.)

"stiff kind of paper," 1839, from card (n.1) + board (n.1). Figurative sense is from 1893. An earlier word for the same stuff was card paper (1777).

Related entries & more 
ream (n.1)

standard commercial measure of paper, rem, mid-14c., from Old French reyme, from Spanish resma, from Arabic rizmah "bundle" (of paper), from rasama "collect into a bundle." The Moors brought manufacture of cotton paper to Spain.

The exact path of transmission of the word to English is unclear, and it might have entered from more than one language. An early variant rym (late 15c.) suggests a Dutch influence: compare Middle Dutch rieme, Dutch riem, which probably were borrowed from Spanish during the Hapsburg control of Holland. For ordinary writing paper, 20 quires of 24 sheets each, or 480 sheets; often 500 or more to allow for waste; the count varies slightly for drawing or printing paper.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
paperless (adj.)

1938 of cigarettes; 1967 of banks; 1971 of offices in reference to automated business systems in which information and communication is not done or stored on paper, from paper (n.) + -less.

Related entries & more 
carton (n.)

1816, "thin pasteboard," from French carton "pasteboard" (17c.), from Italian cartone "pasteboard," augmentative of Medieval Latin carta "paper" (see card (n.1)). Originally the material for making paper boxes; extended 1890 to the boxes themselves. As a verb, from 1921.

Related entries & more 
shinplaster (n.)

also shin-plaster, piece of paper soaked in vinegar and used to treat sore legs, from shin (n.) + plaster (n.). In U.S. history, a jocular phrase or term of abuse for "devalued low-denomination paper currency" (1824).

Related entries & more 
cartouche (n.)
1610s, "scroll-like ornament," also "paper cartridge," from French cartouche, the French form of cartridge (q.v.). From 1830 in reference to oblong figures in Egyptian hieroglyphics enclosing the characters, on their perceived resemblance to rolled paper cartridges.
Related entries & more 
shredder (n.)
1570s, agent noun from shred (v.). In the paper disposal sense from 1950.
Related entries & more 

Page 3