Etymology
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primer (n.3)

"first layer of dye or paint," 1680s, agent noun from prime (v.).

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maulstick (n.)

"light stick used by painters to support the painting hand," 1650s, from Dutch maalstok, literally "painting stick," from mallen "to paint," from Proto-Germanic *mal- (source also of Old Norse mæla, Old High German malon "trace, draw, paint," German malen "to paint"), from mal "spot, mark, stain," perhaps from the same root as Greek melas "black" (see melano-), but the original sense is not color but marking. With stock "stick" (see stock (n.1)).

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viridian (adj.)
1882, from the paint color name (1862), from Latin virid-, stem of viridis "green, blooming, vigorous" (see verdure) + -ian.
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thinner (n.)
liquid used to dilute paint, ink, etc., 1904, agent noun from thin (v.).
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orpiment (n.)

"arsenic trisulphide," a bright yellow mineral substance used in dyeing as a pigment and also medicinally and for destroying lice, late 13c., orpyment, from Old French orpiment "arsenic trisulphide, yellow color," from Latin auripigmentum, from aurum "gold" (see aureate) + pigmentum "coloring matter, pigment, paint," from stem of pingere "to color, paint," from a nasalized form of PIE root *peig- "to cut, mark by incision."

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air-brush (n.)
also airbrush, "atomizer used for spraying liquid ink or paint," 1883, from air (n.1) + brush (n.1). Invented a few years earlier but called at first paint distributer; renamed by U.S. manufacturer Liberty Walkup, who improved the design. As a verb by 1902. Related: Airbrushed; airbrushing.
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Day-Glo 

1951, proprietary name (Dane & Co. of London) for a brand of fluorescent paint. As an adjective, with reference to colors and patterns, by 1959.

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silver screen (n.)
1921, originally in reference to movie house projection screens colored with metallic paint to be more reflective. Transferred sense of "movies generally" is attested from 1924.
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priming (n.)

"first coat of paint or other material given to any surface," c. 1600, verbal noun from prime (v.). Meaning "act of priming a firearm" is by 1590s; that of "gunpowder in the pan of a firearm" is from 1620s.

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stipple (v.)
"paint with dots," 1670s, from Dutch stippelen "to make points," frequentative of stippen "to prick, speckle," from stip "a point," perhaps ultimately from PIE root *st(e)ig- "pointed" (see stick (v.)), or from *steip- "to stick, compress." Related: Stippled; stippling.
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