Etymology
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Clarisse 

fem. proper name, often a diminutive of Clara and its relatives. Also, "a nun of the order of St. Clare" (1790s); the Franciscan order also known as the Poor Clares (c. 1600).

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kilter (n.)

"order, good condition," in out of kilter (1620s), apparently a variant of English dialectal kelter (c. 1600) "good condition, order," a word of unknown origin.

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ordination (n.)

c. 1400, ordinacioun, "divine decree;" early 15c., "arrangement, putting in order," also "the act of admitting to holy orders or the Christian ministry" (the main surviving sense), from Old French ordinacion (12c.) or directly from Latin ordinationem (nominative ordinatio) "a setting in order, ordinance," noun of action from past participle stem of ordinare "to put in order, arrange, dispose, appoint," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)).

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command (n.)

c. 1400, "an order, a command; what is commanded or ordered," from Old French comand (14c.), from comander "to order, to entrust" (see command (v.)). Meaning "control, right or authority to order or compel obedience" is from mid-15c. Meaning "power of control, mastery" (of a situation, a language, etc.) is from 1640s.

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dispose (v.)

late 14c., disposen, "set in order, place in a particular order; give direction or tendency to; incline the mind or heart of," from Old French disposer (13c.) "arrange, order, control, regulate" (influenced in form by poser "to place"), from Latin disponere "put in order, arrange, distribute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). Related: Disposed; disposing.

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subordinate (adj.)

mid-15c., "having an inferior rank," from Medieval Latin subordinatus "placed in a lower order, made subject," past participle of subordinare "place in a lower order," from Latin sub "under" (see sub-) + ordinare "arrange, set in order," from ordo (genitive ordinis) "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Related: Subordinance; subordinant; subordinately. For "of or pertaining to the classificatory rank of a suborder," subordinal (1842) is used.

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coordinate (adj.)

1640s, "of the same order, belonging to the same rank or degree," from Medieval Latin coordinatus, past participle of coordinare "to set in order, arrange," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ordinatio "arrangement," from ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Meaning "involving coordination" is from 1769. Related: Coordinance.

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disarray (n.)

late 14c., "disorder, confusion, condition of being out of regular order," from dis- "opposite of" + array (n.) "order, arrangement, sequence," or perhaps from Old French desarroi.

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inordinate (adj.)

late 14c., "not ordered, lacking order or regularity," from Latin inordinatus "unordered, not arranged," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare "to set in order" (see order (n.)). Sense of "immoderate, excessive" is from notion of "not kept within orderly limits." Related: Inordinately; inordinateness.

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Carthusian (adj.)

in reference to an austere order of monks, late 14c., from Latin Cartusianus, in reference to the order founded 1086 by St. Bruno at Chartreux, village in Dauphiné, France. Compare chartreuse and Charterhouse.

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