Etymology
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b.o. (n.)
by c. 1950, an abbreviation of body odor; an advertisers' invention.
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flavor (n.)
c. 1300, "a smell, odor" (usually a pleasing one), from Old French flaor "smell, odor; action of smelling, sense of smell," probably from Vulgar Latin flator "odor," literally "that which blows," in classical Latin "blower," from flare "to blow, puff," from PIE root *bhle- "to blow."

"Not common before Milton's time" [Century Dictionary], and it is not clear what exactly Milton meant when he used it. The same Vulgar Latin source produced Old Italian fiatore "a bad odor." Sense of "taste, savor" is 1690s, perhaps 1670s; originally "the element in taste which depends on the sense of smell." The -v- in the English word is euphonic or perhaps from influence of savor. Flavor-of-the-month is from 1946 (originally of ice cream).
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redolence (n.)

early 15c., "sweet scent, fragrance," also figurative, from Old French redolence, redolens, which is related to redolent "emitting an odor" (see redolent) or from Medieval Latin redolentia.

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smell (n.)
"odor, aroma, stench," late 12c.; "faculty of perceiving by the nose," c. 1200; see smell (v.). Ousted Old English stenc (see stench) in most senses.
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coolth (n.)

1540s, from cool on the model of warmth. It persists, and was used by Pound, Kipling, etc., but it never has shaken its odor of facetiousness and become standard.

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deodorize (v.)

"deprive of odor or smell, remove any foul or noxious effluvia via chemical or other agency," 1848 (implied in deodorizing); see deodorant + -ize. Related: Deodorized; deodorizer (1849); deodorization.

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nidorous (adj.)

"steaming, reeking, resembling the odor of cooked or burnt meat," 1620s, from Latin nidorosus, from nidor "a steam, fumes, strong smell, aroma," a word of uncertain origin. Latin had  nidoricupius "who loves the smell of cooking."

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fishy (adj.)
late 15c., "fish-like, slimy," from fish (n.) + -y (2). In reference to taste, from 1540s. Sense of "shady, questionable" is first recorded 1840, perhaps from the notion of "slipperiness," or of giving off a bad odor.
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whiff (n.)
13c., weffe "foul scent or odor," of imitative origin. Modern form became popular late 16c. with tobacco smoking, probably influenced by whiffle "blow in gusts or puffs" (1560s). The verb in the baseball slang sense "to swing at a ball and miss" first recorded 1913.
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steam (v.)
Old English stiemen, stymen "emit vapor, emit a scent or odor," from the root of steam (n.). Meaning "go by steam power" is from 1831. Transitive sense from 1660s, "to emit as steam;" meaning "to treat with steam" is from 1798. Slang steam up (transitive) "make (someone) angry" is from 1922. Related: Steamed; steaming.
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