Etymology
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racing (n.)

"the running of races, the occupation or business of arranging for or carrying on races," originally especially horse races, 1670s, verbal noun from race (v.).

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minstrelsy (n.)

c. 1300, menstracie, "instrumental music; action of making music for entertainment; musicians or entertainers generally, the art or occupation of minstrels," from Anglo-French menestralsie, from Old French menestrel (see minstrel).

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employment (n.)

mid-15c., "the spending of money," from Middle English emploien (see employ) + -ment. From 1590s as "an errand or commission;" 1640s as "a person's regular occupation or business."

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-ier 

word-forming element indicating "one whose occupation has to do with," from French and Old French -ier, from Latin -arius (see -ary). Nativized and used to form English words (glazier, hosier, etc.) Also see -yer, and compare -eer.

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semi-professional (adj.)

also semiprofessional, 1824, in reference to one who is paid for an occupation or activity but does not rely on it for sustenance, from semi- + professional (adj.). As a noun from 1843. Related: Semi-professionally.

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Vichy (adj.)

in reference to collaborationist government of France, 1940, from the name of the city in department of Allier in central France, famous for mineral springs, seat 1940-44 of the French government formed under Nazi occupation and headed by Pétain. The place name is of uncertain origin.

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saddlery (n.)

mid-15c., "occupation or trade of a saddler," from saddler + -y (1). From 1841 as "place where saddles are made or sold," in this sense perhaps from or felt as saddle (n.) + -ery.

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millinery (n.)

1670s, "articles made or sold by a milliner;" see milliner + -y (1). By 1838 as "the industry of making bonnets and other headdresses for women," which in 19c. was noted as a women's occupation.

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graft (n.2)

"corruption," 1865, perhaps 1859, American English, perhaps from British slang graft "one's occupation" (1853), which is perhaps from the identical word meaning "a ditch, moat," literally "a digging" (1640s), from Middle Dutch graft, from graven "to dig" (see grave (v.)).

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calling (n.)

mid-13c., "outcry, shouting," also "a summons or invitation," verbal noun from call (v.). The sense of "vocation, profession, trade, occupation" (1550s) traces to I Corinthians vii.20, where it means "position or state in life."

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